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Trauma

trauma risk in teens

Trauma Risk in Teens Could Transfer Through Generations

Trauma Risk in Teens Could Transfer Through Generations 1280 720 se_admin

The trauma risk in teens isn’t low. Surveys and research report around 68 percent of adolescents have gone through at least once potentially traumatizing experience by the age 16. While full-blown PTSD isn’t incredibly common, the effects of trauma are. Especially relevant, 1 in 5 of those who have had a potentially traumatizing event will have complications like school issues, emotional difficulties, and more.

A recent study delved into a factor that can possibly increase the trauma risk in teens: ancestors.

Ancestors could increase trauma risk in teens

The study’s participants were just under 47,000 children from Finland who had evacuated to Sweden during WWII. From 1950 to 2010, researchers tracked the health of the offspring of those original children–which ended up being over 93,000 people.  

The study concluded that “the daughters of women exposed to childhood trauma are at increased risk for serious psychiatric disorders.” Furthermore, the increased risk was shown to be about twice as likely to be hospitalized for mental illness and four times as likely to develop a mood disorder.

Possibly most shocking was how male children experienced no increased risk. Women have been found to be more susceptible to the effects of trauma, so this study could inspire more research into why.

Lead author, Torsten Santavirta, explained what this research means for the future:

“The most important takeaway is that childhood trauma can be passed on to offspring and the wrinkle here is that these associations are sex-specific.”

Identifying the signs of trauma in your daughter

Early identification and intervention play a critical role in treatment. Thus, knowing the signs of trauma can give your daughter the best chance to move forward.

Common symptoms of trauma may include:

  • Distancing from family and friends
  • Irregular sleep patterns
  • Lack of interest in school, friends, family, etc.
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Overreacting to minor irritations
  • Difficulties in concentration, short-term memory, and problem-solving
  • Reckless or dangerous behavior
  • Substance abuse

If you believe your daughter is struggling, it’s imperative to seek out a professional for further guidance.

Solstice East is here to help your daughter

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, therefore our program centers itself around them. Our students receive help for anxiety, depression, smartphone addiction, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. Also, we offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about how we deal with trauma risk in teens at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Causes of Trauma: Adversity Can Follow Children to Adulthood

Causes of Trauma: Adversity Can Follow Children to Adulthood se_admin

When it comes to trauma, most people think of soldiers and war–but trauma is much more common than that. The causes of trauma are vast, yet we’re only beginning to scratch the surface on the full effects they have on us and our children.

In a recent TED talk, Nadine Burke Harris took to the stage to explain why childhood trauma can have such a dramatic effect on our lives.

The early years of life are the most transformatory. Our brains, bodies, values, and personalities develop during this period of time–but this also makes us incredibly exposed and vulnerable.

Nadine Burke Harris explains how causes of trauma impact DNA

“Early adversity drastically affects health across a lifetime.” -Dr. Nadine Burke Harris

Nadine Burke Harris is a pediatrician and the founder and CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, an institution that focuses on not just physical health, but mental health. Their goal is to prevent, screen, and heal the impacts of toxic stress.

At her institution, each child is screened at physicals using the ACE point system, which we’ll get into a bit later.

When a child’s result is positive, they’re referred to a multidisciplinary team that specializes in finding the causes of trauma and treating them. Along with this, parents are educated on the effects of trauma and how to spot red flags.

Compelling research showing that early trauma leads to difficulty throughout life is what inspired the creation of the Center for Youth Wellness. In high doses, trauma impacts brain development, the immune system, hormones, and even how our DNA is read and transcribed.

If left untreated, childhood trauma can lead to triple the risk of developing heart disease and lung cancer–and potentially shortens your life expectancy by 20 years.

Dr. Burke Harris describes trauma as something that “literally gets under our skin and changes our physiology.” The causes of trauma include everything from natural disasters to abuse to neglect to being raised by an alcoholic.

The research that changed the game

The research that changed her life was the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study by Dr. Vince Felitti at Kaiser and Dr. Bob Anda at the CDC. This study asked 17,500 adults about their exposure to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE). Of the participants, around 70 percent were caucasian and 70 percent were college-educated.

For each ACE, they would get a point on their ACE score. Then they correlated the scores to health outcomes and discovered that the higher the ACE score, the lower the heath.

The shocking thing? ACEs weren’t rare–67 percent had at least one ACE, while 12.6 percent (1 in 8) had four or more. That’s the furthest thing from rare; that’s common.

So, after reviewing this study, she decided to create an institution that took trauma into account in order to stop its effects from tainting children’s adulthoods.

While there are many causes of trauma, we’ve developed efficient and effective ways of treating it–the issue is getting people to realize how widespread this problem is.

If you believe your daughter is struggling with trauma or other mental health issues, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for guidance.

Solstice East is here to help your daughter

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our students often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, back to school anxiety, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about how we can help at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Symptoms of Stress in Teens Can Worsen PTSD and Trauma

Symptoms of Stress in Teens Can Worsen PTSD and Trauma se_admin

Identifying danger is a critical component of our minds. It helps us recognize threats, assess dangerous situations, and essentially stay alive–but it can turn on you. It’s becoming clear that symptoms of stress in teens can agitate traumatic memories, making an individual evaluate a harmless situation as a harmful one.

This is called fear generalization and it’s a central part of anxiety disorders and PTSD. A new study shed more light on how this phenomenon comes about and how we can better treat it.

When past experiences taint current reality

This study brings us one step closer to understanding issues related to trauma, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Conducted at the University of Texas at Austin, researchers discovered that stress levels and the length of time since the incident can bolster the tendency towards fear generalization.

Further understanding how our minds have the ability to identify and respond to harmless stimuli as harmful stimuli is critical to understanding how disorders like PTSD function. It allows us to develop better therapies and treatment plans for those struggling with these types of mental illnesses and disorders.

In the study, the researchers delved into why PTSD seems to worsen when stress levels rise. It seems that in moments of heightened cortisol levels (the “stress hormone”), participants’ ability to tell between harmful and harmless stimuli was blurred.

There were two groups in the study. Each were played two tones; on one of the tones, they would get shocked. One of the two groups had heightened cortisol levels, the other did not. When played a range of tones immediately after the shock, both groups were able to discern between the harmful tone and the harmless tone.

But here’s where it gets interesting.

About a day later, they did the same test–playing a range of tones for the two groups. The group that had their cortisol levels raised had many more issues discerning between the harmful and harmless tones than the group that hadn’t.

This sheds some light on why symptoms of stress in teens have the ability to disturb their PTSD or traumatic memories. There’s still much more we don’t understand about the link between stress and memory, but this study has brought us one step closer to providing better treatments.    

Solstice East treats symptoms of stress in teens

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our students often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about how we treat symptoms of stress in teens at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Certain Therapies Proven to Give Best PTSD Treatment for Teens

Certain Therapies Proven to Give Best PTSD Treatment for Teens 150 150 se_admin

While PTSD treatment for teens is getting more and more attention, there’s still much we need to delve into about effectiveness and efficiency. We’ve just recently gained momentum in convincing the world that PTSD is more than just an issue for soldiers–so now we need to move on to perfecting the treatment.

A recent study has looked into what therapeutic interventions are the most effective for the disorder: the winner seems to be EMDR therapy–a therapy commonly used at Solstice East. 

What is EMDR therapy?

So, what is EMDR therapy you ask? EMDR therapy is a method of working through and accepting adverse memories. You do it by moving your eyes right to left over and over and over again.

I know what you’re thinking, it sounds like something out of a science fiction book, right? There can’t be a way to help trauma victims that is as easy as moving your eyes back and forth many, many times. Well, it exists–and it works.

In the average session, an individual is told to focus on their traumatic event, whether it was a natural disaster, the loss of a loved one, or going through abuse. Then they begin the eye movement.

The theory is that moving our eyes back and forth while awake activates this ability to “process” much like we do in Rapid Eye Movement (REM). By focusing on a negative experience and moving your eyes, you’re helping your brain process what happened, allowing for a more objective view on it. Instead of an unprocessable, distressing memory, it becomes a more “normal” memory–one that doesn’t immediately elicit an emotional response when thought of.

The research backing the therapy

In a recent study by the University of Amsterdam and GGZ Rivierduinen, researchers found that “children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) can be successfully treated with only a few hours of EMDR or cognitive behavioral writing therapy (CBWT).”

While studies have been done on the effectiveness of EMDR for adults, little has been done for adolescents and children. This study sought to change that.

In the study, they used over 100 children and adolescents. They found that the average number of sessions needed to reach a successful treatment was four. EMDR was found to be the fastest at reaching positive outcomes, averaging at about 2 hours and 20 minutes. The did follow-up interviews a year later and found that the results were long lasting.

This is incredibly important information because out of children who are exposed to a trauma, around 16 percent will develop PTSD–but many of those children never actually receive PTSD treatment. EMDR gives professionals a fast and effective route that will likely help a child struggling with trauma.

If you believe your daughter is struggling with trauma or another mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for guidance.

Solstice East offers PTSD treatment for girls

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our students often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about our PTSD treatment at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Early Treatment for Trauma Shown to be Critical for Recovery

Early Treatment for Trauma Shown to be Critical for Recovery se_admin

Your house being reduced to rubble during an earthquake, all of your belongings being washed away from a hurricane, losing someone in a car accident—traumatic events can have an intense impact on the adult human brain, but for the adolescent brain it can be even more damaging if treatment for trauma isn’t applied soon enough.

More studies are looking into how to improve treatment for trauma victims and the effects of experiencing a traumatic event. As a society, we’re becoming more aware that PTSD and trauma isn’t just for soldiers–it can happen to any of us, especially the young ones.

Mass trauma can affect young self-confidence

Let’s say a hurricane hits the coast. Communities are wrecked, families are displaced, and life is completely disrupted. In the moment, people do what they have to do to survive and get to safety, but what about afterwards? What are the effects?

This is exactly what a recent study by Iowa State University looked into. The researchers found that while whole communities were impacted, the children inside them had the most lasting effects.

They believe that this could be linked to how the children perceive their ability to intervene or control a situation. A disaster such as a hurricane can completely change a child’s understanding of their well-being–which is important for forming self-confidence in the later years.

They found that gender played a role, too. After traumatic events, girls were much more likely to experience PTSD symptoms compared to boys.

One researcher believes that this study shows we need to build coping mechanisms and ways to work through trauma before it’s actually needed. Understanding how children react to adverse events can help develop better and more efficient forms of treatment for trauma.

We need to strive to teach our children how to deal with bad things in effective ways–otherwise PTSD symptoms and other issues have a higher risk of developing. When a traumatic event happens, one of the first reactions is to not talk about it–but that’s often a mistake. Talking through it with a professional can help an individual work through their trauma rather than shoving it aside until it gets even worse.

Solstice East is here for your family

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our students often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about treatment for trauma at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

 

EMDR Therapy Helps Teens Cope with Traumatic Events

EMDR Therapy Helps Teens Cope with Traumatic Events 150 150 se_admin

Many teenagers experience trauma, it’s just a fact of life. Whether it’s a natural disaster, accident, or abuse, many teens go through it and need treatment afterwards. While there are many treatments available, one in particular is beginning to show more and more positive results: EMDR therapy.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy started being used in the 1980s and has been gaining traction ever since. It has been shown to be extremely effective in helping teenagers work through and cope with traumatic events.

EMDR therapy sounds like something out of a sci-fi novel

So, what is EMDR therapy you ask? EMDR therapy is a method of working through and accepting adverse memories. You do it by moving your eyes right to left over and over and over again.

I know what you’re thinking, it sounds like something out of a science fiction book, right? There can’t be a way to help trauma victims that is as easy as moving your eyes back and forth many, many times. Well, it exists–and it works.

In the average session, an individual is told to focus on their traumatic event, whether it was a natural disaster, the loss of a loved one, or going through abuse. Then they begin the eye movement. It’s theorized that this works because of a link to the stage of sleep called Rapid Eye Movement (REM).

During this stage, with our eyes closed, our eyes move back and forth. Our brain activates and begins to go through new information, repeating important facts and moments, learning, and processing what happened throughout the day. It’s an essential part of functioning.

The theory is that moving our eyes back and forth while awake activates this ability to “process.” By focusing on a negative experience and moving your eyes, you’re helping your brain process what happened, allowing for a more objective view on it. Instead of an unprocessable, distressing memory, it becomes a more “normal” memory–one that doesn’t immediately elicit an extremely emotional response when thought of.

Currently, EMDR therapy is used to treat trauma quite often. It’s used alongside other therapies, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, in order to strengthen effectiveness.

Solstice East could help your daughter

If you believe your daughter is struggling with processing trauma or has a mental health issue, it’s critical to seek out a professional for further guidance on how to best help her thrive.

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, bullying, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. We strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how we use EMDR therapy at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

PTSD in Teenagers Messes with Emotion Identification

PTSD in Teenagers Messes with Emotion Identification 150 150 se_admin

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often associated with soldiers and only soldiers. While soldiers undoubtedly experience this disorder, there are other groups of people completely separate from the battlefield that do, too. PTSD in teenagers is a real issue that has begun to get more and more attention.

It can cause serious challenges in day-to-day life, making it a hot topic for parents who have had a child experience something traumatic.

How PTSD can affect how teens read emotions

A recent study discovered a link between struggling to read emotions and PTSD in teenagers. The study, conducted by New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, found that PTSD in teenagers had an effect specifically with sad, fearful, and angry faces.

In the study, the researchers compared teens that had symptoms of PTSD and teens that had symptoms of conduct disorder. Conduct disorder causes rebellious, disruptive behavior usually as a result of difficulties or trauma early in life. Experiencing trauma increases an individual’s chance of developing PTSD and conduct disorder, which is why the researchers compared the two.

PTSD in teenagers can often cause antisocial or aggressive behaviors towards peers and others. Researchers at NYU were curious whether this had anything to do with facial expressions. Turns out, it just might.

By studying almost 400 teenagers, aged 13 to 19, the researchers were able to gain a deeper perspective on how trauma affects functioning. Specifically, they found that individuals who were showing behavioral and emotional issues had more problems identifying anger. Individuals who fit the bill for PTSD were actually found to confuse sad or angry emotions for fear.

Shabnam Javdani, one of the leaders of the study and assistant professor at NYU, explained why this may be:

“Our findings suggest that exposure to stress and trauma can have acute emotional impacts that simply translate to misidentification of important affective cues…Fear is particularly relevant for understanding PTSD, as the disorder has been associated with a ‘survival mode’ of functioning characterized by an overactive fight-or-flight response and increased threat perception.”

While the link between trauma and issues identifying facial expressions has been recognized in studies before, this delves deeper into the adolescent side of it all. Every bit of information just adds another piece to the puzzle that is the teenage brain, allowing professionals to develop more effective and efficient treatments for the future.

Solstice East treats PTSD in teenagers

If you believe your daughter may be struggling with a serious mental health issue, it’s essential to seek out professionals for further guidance. The faster your daughter receives treatment, the better her chances are of succeeding.

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, PTSD in teenagers, ADHD, bullying, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. We strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how we treat PTSD in teenagers at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Living with Trauma: Overcoming PTSD from Childhood

Living with Trauma: Overcoming PTSD from Childhood 150 150 se_admin

In movies, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is often the burden of army veterans coming home from lengthy wars. In reality, however, PTSD is far more complex. PTSD can occur in anyone, at any age. Living with PTSD from childhood, for instance, can be extremely taxing – especially considering that, unlike its adult counterpart, PTSD from childhood can have symptoms that are not commonly associated with PTSD. As a parent, there are few things more difficult than watching a child suffer. Fortunately, there are several tips that can help ease the situation.

Different Responses

Trauma is one of the most difficult concepts to define. Although mental illness is rarely easy to understand, certain patterns can be observed with most disorders. Depression or bipolar disorder, for example, come with a range of symptoms that appear most often. While each person’s individual situation might be different, it typically fits under the overarching umbrella of their diagnosis. With PTSD, however, matters become more nebulous.

PTSD is a response to trauma. However, most people who experience trauma do not develop PTSD. As a matter of fact, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, “Studies show that about 15% to 43% of girls and 14% to 43% of boys go through at least one trauma. Of those children and teens who have had a trauma, 3% to 15% of girls and 1% to 6% of boys develop PTSD.” Moreover, to further complicate matters, no two traumas are alike. The very definition of trauma depends on each person – and there are indicators that this is guided as much by biology as circumstance.

PTSD in children takes on a different shape than PTSD in adults. Where an adult might experience flashbacks, children typically put events in the wrong order or think that there were signs that could have led them to prevent the traumatic event in the first place. An adult typically withdraws from everybody, while a child might withdraw from all but a small, tightly-knit group. With age, a child might become disruptive, have problems in school, and be more likely to experiment with substances.

Finding Help for PTSD From Childhood

Perhaps the most important thing a parent can do to help their child struggling with PTSD is to be available to talk and discuss the situation – should the child want support. PTSD can spark unrelated fears in a child, so parents should be prepared for seemingly unrelated topics of conversation as well.

If your child is exhibiting symptoms of PTSD, it may be time to contact professional help. Solstice East helps young women ages 14-18 deal with trauma. For more information, call (855) 672-7058 today!

PTSD Therapy: How Trauma and Stress Can Act Differently

PTSD Therapy: How Trauma and Stress Can Act Differently 150 150 se_admin

“They were too young to remember.”

Have you ever heard that because an individual can’t remember a specific traumatic event, it won’t affect them? If so, it’s completely false information. Research over the years has proven that early traumatic events–even the ones you don’t remember because you were so young–can, in fact, affect you later down the road, even to the point of needing PTSD therapy.

Even though a child may not understand what’s happening in that moment, it can definitely cause issues later. These traumatic moments can be anything from abuse to natural disaster to losing a loved one. By assuming these events won’t affect someone because of their age, many young people are being left in the dark with few coping mechanisms for what they’re going through.

This is just one of the many examples of trauma affecting someone in a way many don’t expect.

Impact of trauma can be delayed

Let’s say the night after a traumatic event–a car accident, for example–your teenager sleeps fine. For the next week, they’re absolutely fine; there seems to be no change in behavior and you think everything is back to normal. Then, suddenly, they begin to have nightmares and anxiety attacks–possibly even leading to PTSD therapy.

How could the effects of the actual event be delayed for that long?

A study by the National Centre for Biological Sciences looked specifically into this question. The researchers discovered that just one extremely stressful event can lead to increased activity in the amygdala–nightmares, panic attacks, and more–but not until days later. The amygdala plays a large role in memory, making decisions, and processing emotions; it’s also one of the parts of the brain most connected with PTSD.

Hopefully, this information will lead to further research and possibly improvements in how traumatic events are handled early on. As a program that offers PTSD therapy, we’re familiar with the symptoms and effects of trauma. We also know how important early intervention is. If you believe your daughter is struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional immediately.

Waiting and hoping things will improve usually ends badly, it is much better to reach out for help in deciding whether this issue is cause for alarm.

Solstice East offers PTSD therapy for teen girls

Solstice East is a residential treatment center which offers PTSD therapy for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, PTSD, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. In our PTSD therapy, we strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how PTSD therapy at Solstice East can help your daughter, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

What PTSD Help Options Are Available for Struggling Teens?

What PTSD Help Options Are Available for Struggling Teens? 150 150 se_admin

When someone mentions PTSD, what comes to mind? For most, it’s an image related to a solider that has experienced some intense tragedy in war. While this type of adversity can definitely result in PTSD, it’s not the only challenge that can lead to it. No one really thinks of teenagers needing PTSD help, but it’s actually an issue that many face. Trauma or PTSD can be caused by anything from bullying to losing a loved one–the possibilities are endless (unfortunately).

Expectedly, this generalization that only soldiers can have PTSD can lead to many young people feeling as if they have nowhere to turn—this is far from the truth, though. Many PTSD help options exist for struggling teens, but many parents don’t know they exist; which is why we’ve compiled a list of therapies and programs that help with trauma and PTSD.

Options for teens struggling with PTSD or trauma

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

This type of therapy can be extremely effective as trauma or PTSD help for adolescents. CBT focuses on taking bleak, damaging thoughts and replacing them with helpful, constructive ones. Especially if a child is having issues with memories of their trauma, CBT can be a great first route.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

Now EMDR takes a slightly different approach–by combining cognitive therapy and directed eye movements, EMDR has been found to be effective in treating trauma and PTSD. Though it’s been found to be effective, certain aspects of it are still being argued on whether they’re necessary or not, but the strategy is still widely used and helpful as PTSD help.

Therapy & Medication

This isn’t always necessary, but it all depends on what specific issues an individual faces. If the trauma or PTSD they’re experiencing has morphed into a dual diagnosis with anxiety or depression, medication could be used in combination with therapy in order to get the desired outcome.

Residential treatment

Residential treatment is an intensive, full-bodied therapeutic experience that cannot be found elsewhere. It takes a teen and places them in a fully immersive environment in which they receive 24/7 support and care. This often allows an individual to take a breath and truly begin to move forward in their healing process.

As you can see above, there are many options available for PTSD help–and those are just the common ones. There are opportunities and programs which can help your family get back on their feet, you just have to seek them out.

Solstice East offers PTSD help for teen girls

Solstice East is a residential treatment center which offers PTSD help for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, PTSD, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. In our PTSD help, we strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about PTSD help at Solstice East can help your daughter, please contact us at 828-484-9946.