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Trauma Treatment

Trauma Treatment Center for Teens: When Grief Becomes Unhealthy

Trauma Treatment Center for Teens: When Grief Becomes Unhealthy 150 150 se_admin

Grief–we all feel it at some point in our lives, but for some it’s experienced far too early on. As a trauma treatment center for teens, we know that grief is a natural response to loss, most frequently having to deal with the death of a loved one–but this natural response can run out of control. It can fill an individual with unrelenting sadness and hopelessness, essentially making daily life a struggle. Untreated, this type of grief can ruin a person’s life–which is why it is so critical to understand what is normal and what is not when it comes to grief.

trauma treatment center for teensWhat can cause grief?

When you think of grief, what comes to mind? For most people, they think of losing a loved one–this is the most frequent cause of grief. There are other causes, though. Grief can arise when an individual or a loved one of the individual is diagnosed with a terminal illness. Even the loss of a relationship or friendship can trigger strong feelings of grief.

For adolescents, grief can be much different than in adults. Adults have had the time and experience to build up defenses and coping methods for grief–teenagers haven’t. In our trauma treatment center for teens, we know this can make the trauma of grief much more potent and unstable, which is why we treat it.

The difference between normal and harmful grief

As said before, grief is a normal, human response to loss. We feel grief when we’ve lost opportunities, relationships, friendships, and loved ones. It’s when that grief runs free with an uncontrollable force that it becomes an issue. When someone isn’t equipped with the proper coping methods, grief can go from normal to extremely destructive. When it begins to get in the way of daily life and throws an individual into a deep, deep depression, help should be sought out.

If you believe your daughter is struggling with grief, trauma, or any other mental health issue, it’s critical to seek out help as soon as possible. Early intervention and treatment is the key to success in these cases–don’t wait until it’s too late.

Our trauma treatment center for teens can help your daughter

Solstice East is a trauma treatment center for teens–specifically for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls are often grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, grief, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. In our trauma treatment center for teens, we strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about how our trauma treatment center for teens at Solstice East can help your daughter, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Treatment For Trauma Sorely Needed For Our Children

Treatment For Trauma Sorely Needed For Our Children 150 150 se_admin

treatment for traumaSome people can go through a rough, traumatic time relatively smoothly–but for many, it’s strenuous and tests them greatly. Struggling with trauma does not mean an individual is a less capable person or “weak”–it just means they need extra help to get through it. This is why treatment for trauma exists: to help individuals work through their trauma effectively and constructively.

When I say “effectively and constructively,” I mean that a treatment for trauma shouldn’t just focus on helping that person through their trauma, it should also equip them with the tools to take on future traumas with more ease.

Trauma in adolescents

In a study by The National Child Traumatic Stress Network, researchers found that “more than 68% of children and adolescents had experienced a potentially traumatic event by the age of 16.” Out of those that had experienced one traumatic event, around 20 percent experienced impairments–like emotional difficulties and school troubles. Out of those that had experienced more than one traumatic event, the rate spiked up to 50 percent. Those numbers mean that many more teens face the effects of trauma than most parents believe–I know that those figures alarmed me.

Now that we’ve determined that trauma isn’t necessarily rare in adolescents, we can move onto the options for treatment for trauma.

How trauma is treated

Compared for adult treatment for trauma, youth treatment for trauma still has a long road ahead of it. This is largely because of the barriers surrounding research on trauma in children compared to adults. While this may be true, inpatient programs have been proven to be extremely effective in treating trauma. They take the evidence-based approaches to treating trauma and combine them with a full, supportive therapeutic environment.

The most common form of therapy used as a treatment for trauma is cognitive-behavioral therapy. This type of therapy focuses on “teaching children stress management and relaxation skills to help them cope with unpleasant feelings and physical sensations about the trauma.” In this type of therapy, the teen and therapist talk about the event and the feelings surrounding it–all at a pace that’s appropriate for the specific individual. It’s also used to dispel any incorrect ideas surrounding the traumatic event; youth often believe the event had something to do with how they acted, but this is rarely correct and usually worsens the event in their mind for them. Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps the individual to work through the trauma in a logical way, allowing them to eventually move past it.  

Other types of therapies are used as a treatment for trauma, like Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. If you believe your child is suffering from trauma or other mental health conditions, it’s critical to seek help from a professional.

Solstice East offers treatment for trauma

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about treatment for trauma at Solstice East, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

Children and Trauma: The Importance of Feelings

Children and Trauma: The Importance of Feelings 150 150 se_admin

Children and trauma can be a difficult mix to deal with in a family. Traumatic experiences affect every child differently, making it hard to have a “handbook” or set of “tips” to help with such a complicated thing. In a recent PsychCentral article, the importance of validating feelings for children who have experienced trauma is highlighted.

Children and trauma

children and traumaChildren and trauma is a unique issue. Adolescents are still learning what is “normal” and what is not. Oftentimes, adolescents aren’t sure if the abuse or trauma they’re experiencing is “normal” or not. They’re not sure if other kids are experiencing the same thing. Trauma is complicated. It’s not simple like the other aspects of a child or teen’s life–homework, school drama, and all that good stuff that comes with adolescence.

At this age, youths haven’t experienced enough to understand their situations fully. Children and trauma are complicated. It’s not uncommon for someone experiencing trauma to try and “act normal.” So how do you help a child that’s experienced trauma? You validate their feelings. If it made them feel bad, it was most likely bad. If they felt humiliated or violated, they were probably right to feel those feelings. 

It can be hard for an adolescent to trust their instinctive feelings when those feelings are looked down upon by society. The stigma against seeking help for mental struggles–like trauma–keeps those experiencing these struggles from reaching out. It leads to many of them ignoring the feelings, which makes it even worse.

Dr. Karyn Hall, Ph.D. says, “Validating yourself is like glue for fragmented parts of your identity. Validating yourself will help you accept and better understand yourself, which leads to a stronger identity and better skills at managing intense emotions.”

As parents, we can help these children. And trauma doesn’t have to rule their lives. Make sure that your child knows they can come to you to talk without judgement. Make sure they know they can turn to you with any feelings they find confusing or conflicting.

If you believe your daughter is struggling with trauma or other mental health issues, it’s imperative to seek out guidance from a professional.

We can help your daughter

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness. We understand children and trauma, we can help.

For more information about how Solstice East helps teens struggling with trauma, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

From Generation to Generation: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Teenagers

From Generation to Generation: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Teenagers 150 150 se_admin

post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers https://www.flickr.com/photos/ashleyboldaslove/1872850540/in/photolist-3RuRdy-agooV2-7UHRqw-pCZbdV-dNmorf-qmkpY9-b9VJCK-gNb21p-o8nYeK-bjVMbD-62g8Sj-s7K8gk-5fMcNN-8eswZj-jzEJaD-dxoegr-9QcZbU-7Gpzxm-6jusa1-cXzRWS-agBZzc-C4fwE-d1P1nS-4pKZSq-dWJEZ6-aq2yTE-6i6apd-dyuhPJ-VirTZ-ovnBGs-2C3DjZ-4rUgMG-eYKHd7-9uxBe8-dyPFbQ-hiC11p-7dAVGW-91gQk4-nTHqr7-5BdLJg-j3Q6wH-59XrWC-p3YN4g-7Ta1iw-837GAE-rbb1Nw-g9kSie-r9UurX-pgm5Jd-ra2Rgh

According to a recent article by Psych Central, a recent study has found that post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers may be transmitted to children of holocaust survivors. New research has found that both Holocaust survivors and their offspring show similar genetic changes at the same site, a stress-related gene that has been linked to post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers.

It has not been unknown that the children of traumatized people are at increased risk for post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers, as well as mood and anxiety disorders. This new research suggests that paternal trauma is a relevant contributor to offspring biology.

The Research

One of the most intensively studied groups to be studied in regards to post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers caused by parent trauma, is the group of children of survivors of the Nazi concentration camps. From this work, researchers have been growing evidence and their data by evaluating other studies that have been done.

The researchers examined blood samples of 32 Holocaust survivors and 22 of their adult children for methylation of intron 7, a specific region within the FKBP5 gene. The researchers also studied Jewish parent-offspring pairs as a control group.

The analysis revealed that both Holocaust survivors and their offspring show genetic changes at the same site of FKBP5 intron 7, but in the opposite direction: Holocaust survivors had 10 percent higher methylation than the control parents, while the Holocaust offspring had 7.7 percent lower methylation than the control offspring.

The Meaning of this Research

Researchers state:

“The observation that the changes in parent and child are in opposing directions suggests that children of traumatized parents are not simply born with a PTSD-like biology [post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers]. They may inherit traits that promote resilience as well as vulnerability.”

This research highlights the need for parents to be more aware of their children’s mental health if they, as parents, have suffered a traumatic experience in their lifetime. If you or your child are dealing with post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers, there are programs available that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East can help your teen, please call 828-484-9946.

Helping Heal Trauma Through Residential Treatment for Teens

Helping Heal Trauma Through Residential Treatment for Teens 150 150 se_admin

Trauma can make it hard for a teenager to move through daily life. It can hinder their learning, focus, and even their joy. Trauma has the power to trigger further mental health challenges like depression or anxiety. When it gets to this point for a teen, residential treatment for teens offers a unique opportunity to overcome that trauma.

residential treatment for teensWhat is residential treatment?

Residential treatment for teens temporarily removes struggling youth from the distractions of the outside world and provide them with a safe environment to heal. In this safe, supervised environment with trained staff, teens receive intensive therapeutic treatment for the challenges they’re facing individually. Often these challenges have to do with serious behavioral and emotional problems–some brought about by trauma.

To treat these challenges, programs usually include a comprehensive evaluation and individualized treatment plan in order to give each adolescent the best care possible. Residential treatment for teens often includes a combination of individual, group, and family therapy.

How is trauma treated in residential treatment?

In residential treatment for teens, many diagnoses and issues are typically treated–trauma is just one of them. Since trauma usually comes with other complications (anxiety, depression, etc.), the fact that residential treatment for teens can treat many problems is extremely helpful. This way, the program is flexible enough to fit the needs of many different students.

Problems that often arise with serious trauma in teens include self-harm, aggression, substance abuse, low self-esteem, depression, and more. To treat trauma in residential treatment for teens, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) are commonly used.

CBT is used to get a teen to revisit a trauma and change the thoughts surrounding it. Many traumatic experiences cause teens to begin thinking thoughts like, “The world is extremely dangerous and I’ll never be safe.” You can imagine how much anxiety that would produce. CBT works to remove the intense fear produced by traumatic memories and experiences. Teens going through CBT talk about their experiences, how they feel about them, what that makes them think, and teaches them ways to calm themselves at their own pace.

EDMR is often used in combination with CBT. Its purpose is to also remove the fear associated with traumatic memories.  

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for teens

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, teenage girl body image issues, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about Solstice East’s residential treatment for teens, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

Coping with Grief: Understanding Grieving Styles 

Coping with Grief: Understanding Grieving Styles  150 150 se_admin

coping with grief

Coping with grief  is a difficult task. Many of us have different methods for coping with grief. A recent article by Psychology Today discussed how boys and girls handle grief differently. In the book Grief Beyond Gender: Understandings the Ways Men and Women Mourn, Dr. Terry Martin discusses the two patterns of grieving.

Styles of Grief

The first style of coping with grief is an intuitive pattern where individuals experience and express grief in an effective way. In this pattern, grieving individuals find strategies that are focused toward the expression of affect. The second pattern of coping with grief, is one that is labeled instrumental. Here, grief is experienced physically, such as in a restlessness or thought. Here the strategies individuals use tend to be, cognitive and active as well.

Some individuals may show a mix of patterns that draw from both intuitive and instrumental reactions and responses in the ways that individuals experience, express, and adapt to coping with grief. Other individuals may show inconsistencies between the ways that grief is experienced and expressed. These inconsistent patterns are labeled as dissonant.

As society we believe that there is a clear relation between gender and coping with grief, but this has been shown to not necessarily be true. The instrumental pattern of dissonant, is typical in the way many men grieve, due to contemporary patterns of male socialization. Women also may exhibit an instrumental style. And many women and men represent grievers who demonstrate more intuitive patterns. Clearly, patterns are influenced by gender but not determined by it.

Tips on Coping with Grief

If you find yourself have difficulty coping with grief, here are some tips on how to deal with grief in a healthy and productive way.

  • Listen. Don’t ignore your emotions–if you need to cry, that’s fine; if you need to sob, that’s fine; if you need to talk to someone, that’s fine. The important thing is to listen to what your body and feelings are trying to tell you.
  • Breathe. Deep breaths help trigger the parasympathetic nervous system, helping you calm yourself down when things get tough.
  • Be Aware. When dealing with teen grief, don’t just float through the days; take a moment to be mindful of what’s happening currently to you and others around you.
  • Cry. There’s a huge stigma against crying, but it’s your body’s way of coping and instead of avoiding it when you feel it coming, let it out.
  • Enjoy. Try to notice the small things that improve your day, like the taste of coffee or hitting 3 green lights in a row.
  • Don’t Be Hard on Yourself. Don’t think about other’s expectations of you, just your own. Be realistic and stop thinking about what you should do for other people–focus on you.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

The Benefits of Community-Based Care in Residential Treatment Facilities

The Benefits of Community-Based Care in Residential Treatment Facilities 150 150 se_admin

No one wants to feel alone. Especially if you’re struggling with a mental health issue and you are also a teenager. Finding a group of people who accept you for who you are and who are looking out for your best interests is one of the best things that can happen to someone struggling with mental health issues. Community-based care at residential treatment facilities can offer that sense of community which can really promote healing and self-confidence.

Why Community-Based Care In Residential Treatment Facilities Is Effective

Community-based care, like what you’d find in residential treatment facilities, is so effective because of the level of support found there. Teens who attend residential treatment facilities find  themselves in a structured community environment where each and every one of their needs are taken care of. residential treatment facilities

In such a milieu, teens are supported every step of the way by their peers, mentors, and therapists. Community-based care in residential treatment facilities can improve a teen’s overall social skills and can boost their self esteem and self confidence tenfold

At residential treatment facilities with structured communities, teens feel like they have a place in the community. Before entering into treatment, they may not have felt that way about themselves. Structured community environments prepare teens to transition back home into their community by teaching a variety of life skills that can be used throughout a resident’s life.

Eliminating Stigma in Residential Treatment Facilities

Our society has continued to enforce a stigma around mental health and those who struggle with mental health issues. Community-based residential treatment facilities that encourage community involvement through community service and other activities help to eliminate this stigma within the community that residential treatment facilities are located in.

When teens go out and participate in community service activities, they interact with people from all walks of life in their community. Through these interactions, members of the community can see that those struggling with mental health issues are just normal people. This helps eliminate the stigma. Of course, we still have a long way to go before the stigma is eliminated altogether, but baby steps are important.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-17, helps struggling teen girls find success in a community-based environment.

For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058 today.

 

Passed Through Generations: Recent Research On Inherited Family Trauma

Passed Through Generations: Recent Research On Inherited Family Trauma 150 150 se_admin

The saying goes – time heals all wounds. However, when it comes to trauma within the family, this may not be true. More and more research is coming out which shows that inherited family trauma can be extremely emotionally damaging to family members long after the emotional trauma has occurred.

Children and grandchildren can experience the effects of trauma experienced by their mothers and grandmothers. These effects can come in the form of depression, self harming behaviors, and other mental health struggles. family trauma

How do people inherit family trauma?

A 2014 study which explored why people can feel the effects of past family trauma uncovered a piece of the puzzle about the physiological processes which underlie inherited family trauma.

Researchers in this study identified a key component surrounding inherited family trauma – short RNA molecules. Our DNA contains a large number of short RNA molecules which are known as microRNAs. They help regulate how many copies of specific proteins are made within DNA.

Short RNA molecules affected by family trauma

In the 2014 study, researchers studied mice who experienced some sort of trauma earlier in their lives. They then compared these mice to other mice who had never experienced traumatic conditions.

The mice who had experienced traumatic conditions prior to the experiment started behaving strangely. Many of the mice began losing their natural aversion to bright lights and open spaces. Others began behaving in a depressive way. These behaviors were transferred from generation to generation through sperm, even though the offspring had never experienced the traumatic event themselves.

Through their observations, they found that stress related to traumatic events changed the amount of microRNA found in the sperm, brain, and blood of the mice.  They found larger amounts of certain microRNA in the traumatized mice and a lower amount in the corresponding tissues of the control mice.

Within the offspring of the mice who had experienced trauma, insulin and blood sugar levels were much lower than the offspring of the control mice. This finding was very important to the researchers because it showed that traumatic experiences can affect metabolism and behaviors in the long term. Those changes were also shown to be hereditary. Researchers found that these physiological changes could also be found  in the third generation of mice, at times.

So what does this mean for inherited family trauma in humans?

Researchers are currently studying what the effects of short RNAs in inherited family trauma within humans. Because of their findings within mice, they are hoping that this knowledge can be used to eventually develop a blood test for humans in order to prevent future mental health struggles.

Is your daughter struggling with trauma?

Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-17, can help your daughter struggling with trauma get the help she needs.

For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058 today!

Four Ways to Address Trauma In Teens

Four Ways to Address Trauma In Teens 150 150 se_admin

When a traumatic event occurs, it may seem like helping your teen work through the trauma is the most challenging thing you’ve ever done. No one wants to see their child suffer, especially after your teen has experienced something absolutely horrifying like assault or a car accident. Parents seeking ways to help their child cope with trauma in teens should consider the following advice for addressing their child’s trauma. trauma in teens

Addressing Trauma In Teens

  1. Believe your child. It’s important that your teen knows you’re on their side in the situation. Instead of denying that their trauma happened in the first place, always accept what your child says happened. Even if it ends up not being true later, it’s much better for your child’s overall mental health if they believe you trust them.
  2. Don’t personalize your guilt. You may feel guilty for your child’s trauma. Don’t let them know that. It’s important to deal with your own feelings over the traumatic event separately from your child. They will feel even worse if they know what you’re going through because of their trauma.
  3. Understand the symptoms. Trauma in teens may look different from the trauma symptoms you’ve heard about in adults. Teens may be withdrawn and isolate themselves from friends and family. They may be experiencing flashbacks and nightmares related to the traumatic event. If your teen is experiencing any symptoms of trauma, it’s important to take action as soon as possible against these symptoms.
  4. Get professional help. It’s important for your teen’s overall well being to seek help as soon as you know that the effects of the traumatic event are making life difficult for your teen. Consider your therapeutic options and find the best fit for your child.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your daughter work through trauma in teens.

For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058 today!

 

Sleep Issues and Childhood Trauma Linked to Cause of Depression

Sleep Issues and Childhood Trauma Linked to Cause of Depression 150 150 se_admin

childhood traumaIn a report by ScienceDaily, the University of Eastern Finland discovered that childhood trauma and disturbed sleep cycles mess up immune system regulation. Depression, childhood trauma, and sleep interruptions are all associated with an increase in physical issues and fluctuations in how the immune system functions. The study mainly focused on the way Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) works and the mechanisms within it that have to do with immune system regulation.

What do immune system changes have to do with depression?

According to the study, changes in the regulation of the immune system are thought to be a large piece in mediating the diseases linked to MDD and the comorbid disorders that develop along with MDD. Childhood trauma and sleep cycle disturbances both cause certain chemicals in the body to elevate or decrease, causing issues with immune system regulation, which in turn plays a large role in an individual’s well-being and likeliness to develop issues associated with MDD.

Childhood trauma a factor in developing depression

Childhood trauma, especially if unknown to the parent or left untreated, can lead to depression. Studies have shown that those who experienced a childhood trauma have a much higher risk of developing depression later in life.

From Mayo Clinic, other factors which increase your teen’s chances of developing or triggering include:

  • Issues which lower self-esteem (obesity, bullying, academic struggles, peer issues, etc.)
  • Witnessing or being the victim of violence (physical or sexual abuse)
  • Having a current condition (bipolar disorder, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, etc.)
  • Dealing with a learning disability and/or ADHD
  • Experiencing frequent pain or suffering from a chronic physical illness (cancer, diabetes, asthma, etc.)
  • Substance abuse
  • Being gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender within an environment which is not supportive
  • Family history of issues with depression

If you believe your daughter is struggling with issues associated with a childhood trauma, it’s imperative to seek out a professional for guidance on how to help your daughter move forward.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, childhood trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. We strive to help our girls develop healthy habits for teens and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East treats issues associated with childhood trauma, please call 828-484-9946.