• Residential Treatment Center for Teens 14-17

Trauma Treatment

Trauma Treatment Centers: The Effects of Stress on the Brain

Trauma Treatment Centers: The Effects of Stress on the Brain 150 150 se_admin

We all feel stressed out from time to time, it’s just another part of life. Sometimes stress can cause serious damage, though. In trauma treatment centers, we deal with individuals who have experienced more than regular stress. The Sidran Institute offers a clear definition of when stress becomes dangerous:

“A traumatic event or situation creates psychological trauma when it overwhelms the individual’s ability to cope, and leaves that person fearing death, annihilation, mutilation, or psychosis. The individual may feel emotionally, cognitively, and physically overwhelmed. The circumstances of the event commonly include abuse of power, betrayal of trust, entrapment, helplessness, pain, confusion, and/or loss.”

It’s in these times that the stress of a situation has the power to fiercely affect a person’s mental and physical state. It can severely impact how a student performs in school, acts at home, and interacts with others.

Stress & trauma disrupt learning

Stress can be positive. It can motivate us to get work done and innovate–but only when we still feel as if we have control of the situation. Stress becomes toxic–even traumatic–when we feel vastly out of control, unable to relax, plagued by stressful thoughts, and hopeless to a situation. In trauma treatment centers, we often deal with adolescents that have undergone this high level of distress.

When stress reaches this negative point, things start to go downhill. According to a study by the University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany, stress has the power to significantly affect learning ability. Researchers found that stress has an effect on the memory that makes it difficult for students to recall or absorb new information.

With the amount of stress students face in daily life nowadays, that should be a bit troubling. A lot of responsibility is placed on their shoulders, but little is taught in the area of how to manage it all in healthy ways. And that’s just the regular stress of a student in modern day America.

For students who have experienced a traumatic event, learning can be even more difficult. Without the proper coping methods, academic performance can plummet along with social, emotional, and physical wellness.

In some studies, it’s been found that chronic stress actually changes the brain in students. The pre-frontal cortex can be affected–which is an essential area that deals with learning. This can cause issues with concentration, creativity, memory, and attention, which are all critical parts of academic performance.

Solstice East is one of the leading teen trauma treatment centers

Solstice East is one of the best residential trauma treatment centers for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, bullying, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. As one of the leading trauma treatment centers, we strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about Solstice East, one of the leading trauma treatment centers, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

PTSD Therapy: How Trauma and Stress Can Act Differently

PTSD Therapy: How Trauma and Stress Can Act Differently 150 150 se_admin

“They were too young to remember.”

Have you ever heard that because an individual can’t remember a specific traumatic event, it won’t affect them? If so, it’s completely false information. Research over the years has proven that early traumatic events–even the ones you don’t remember because you were so young–can, in fact, affect you later down the road, even to the point of needing PTSD therapy.

Even though a child may not understand what’s happening in that moment, it can definitely cause issues later. These traumatic moments can be anything from abuse to natural disaster to losing a loved one. By assuming these events won’t affect someone because of their age, many young people are being left in the dark with few coping mechanisms for what they’re going through.

This is just one of the many examples of trauma affecting someone in a way many don’t expect.

Impact of trauma can be delayed

Let’s say the night after a traumatic event–a car accident, for example–your teenager sleeps fine. For the next week, they’re absolutely fine; there seems to be no change in behavior and you think everything is back to normal. Then, suddenly, they begin to have nightmares and anxiety attacks–possibly even leading to PTSD therapy.

How could the effects of the actual event be delayed for that long?

A study by the National Centre for Biological Sciences looked specifically into this question. The researchers discovered that just one extremely stressful event can lead to increased activity in the amygdala–nightmares, panic attacks, and more–but not until days later. The amygdala plays a large role in memory, making decisions, and processing emotions; it’s also one of the parts of the brain most connected with PTSD.

Hopefully, this information will lead to further research and possibly improvements in how traumatic events are handled early on. As a program that offers PTSD therapy, we’re familiar with the symptoms and effects of trauma. We also know how important early intervention is. If you believe your daughter is struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional immediately.

Waiting and hoping things will improve usually ends badly, it is much better to reach out for help in deciding whether this issue is cause for alarm.

Solstice East offers PTSD therapy for teen girls

Solstice East is a residential treatment center which offers PTSD therapy for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, PTSD, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. In our PTSD therapy, we strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how PTSD therapy at Solstice East can help your daughter, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

What PTSD Help Options Are Available for Struggling Teens?

What PTSD Help Options Are Available for Struggling Teens? 150 150 se_admin

When someone mentions PTSD, what comes to mind? For most, it’s an image related to a solider that has experienced some intense tragedy in war. While this type of adversity can definitely result in PTSD, it’s not the only challenge that can lead to it. No one really thinks of teenagers needing PTSD help, but it’s actually an issue that many face. Trauma or PTSD can be caused by anything from bullying to losing a loved one–the possibilities are endless (unfortunately).

Expectedly, this generalization that only soldiers can have PTSD can lead to many young people feeling as if they have nowhere to turn—this is far from the truth, though. Many PTSD help options exist for struggling teens, but many parents don’t know they exist; which is why we’ve compiled a list of therapies and programs that help with trauma and PTSD.

Options for teens struggling with PTSD or trauma

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

This type of therapy can be extremely effective as trauma or PTSD help for adolescents. CBT focuses on taking bleak, damaging thoughts and replacing them with helpful, constructive ones. Especially if a child is having issues with memories of their trauma, CBT can be a great first route.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

Now EMDR takes a slightly different approach–by combining cognitive therapy and directed eye movements, EMDR has been found to be effective in treating trauma and PTSD. Though it’s been found to be effective, certain aspects of it are still being argued on whether they’re necessary or not, but the strategy is still widely used and helpful as PTSD help.

Therapy & Medication

This isn’t always necessary, but it all depends on what specific issues an individual faces. If the trauma or PTSD they’re experiencing has morphed into a dual diagnosis with anxiety or depression, medication could be used in combination with therapy in order to get the desired outcome.

Residential treatment

Residential treatment is an intensive, full-bodied therapeutic experience that cannot be found elsewhere. It takes a teen and places them in a fully immersive environment in which they receive 24/7 support and care. This often allows an individual to take a breath and truly begin to move forward in their healing process.

As you can see above, there are many options available for PTSD help–and those are just the common ones. There are opportunities and programs which can help your family get back on their feet, you just have to seek them out.

Solstice East offers PTSD help for teen girls

Solstice East is a residential treatment center which offers PTSD help for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, PTSD, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. In our PTSD help, we strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about PTSD help at Solstice East can help your daughter, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Treatment For Trauma Sorely Needed For Our Children

Treatment For Trauma Sorely Needed For Our Children 150 150 se_admin

Some people can go through a rough, traumatic time relatively smoothly–but for many, it’s strenuous and tests them greatly. Struggling with trauma does not mean an individual is a less capable person or “weak”–it just means they need extra help to get through it. This is why treatment for trauma exists: to help individuals work through their trauma effectively and constructively.

When I say “effectively and constructively,” I mean that a treatment for trauma shouldn’t just focus on helping that person through their trauma, it should also equip them with the tools to take on future traumas with more ease.

Trauma in adolescents

In a study by The National Child Traumatic Stress Network, researchers found that “more than 68% of children and adolescents had experienced a potentially traumatic event by the age of 16.” Out of those that had experienced one traumatic event, around 20 percent experienced impairments–like emotional difficulties and school troubles. Out of those that had experienced more than one traumatic event, the rate spiked up to 50 percent. Those numbers mean that many more teens face the effects of trauma than most parents believe–I know that those figures alarmed me.

Now that we’ve determined that trauma isn’t necessarily rare in adolescents, we can move onto the options for treatment for trauma.

How trauma is treated

Compared for adult treatment for trauma, youth treatment for trauma still has a long road ahead of it. This is largely because of the barriers surrounding research on trauma in children compared to adults. While this may be true, inpatient programs have been proven to be extremely effective in treating trauma. They take the evidence-based approaches to treating trauma and combine them with a full, supportive therapeutic environment.

The most common form of therapy used as a treatment for trauma is cognitive-behavioral therapy. This type of therapy focuses on “teaching children stress management and relaxation skills to help them cope with unpleasant feelings and physical sensations about the trauma.” In this type of therapy, the teen and therapist talk about the event and the feelings surrounding it–all at a pace that’s appropriate for the specific individual. It’s also used to dispel any incorrect ideas surrounding the traumatic event; youth often believe the event had something to do with how they acted, but this is rarely correct and usually worsens the event in their mind for them. Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps the individual to work through the trauma in a logical way, allowing them to eventually move past it.  

Other types of therapies are used as a treatment for trauma, like Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. If you believe your child is suffering from trauma or other mental health conditions, it’s critical to seek help from a professional.

Solstice East offers treatment for trauma

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about treatment for trauma at Solstice East, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

Children and Trauma: The Importance of Feelings

Children and Trauma: The Importance of Feelings 150 150 se_admin

Children and trauma can be a difficult mix to deal with in a family. Traumatic experiences affect every child differently, making it hard to have a “handbook” or set of “tips” to help with such a complicated thing. In a recent PsychCentral article, the importance of validating feelings for children who have experienced trauma is highlighted.

Children and trauma

Children and trauma is a unique issue. Adolescents are still learning what is “normal” and what is not. Oftentimes, adolescents aren’t sure if the abuse or trauma they’re experiencing is “normal” or not. They’re not sure if other kids are experiencing the same thing. Trauma is complicated. It’s not simple like the other aspects of a child or teen’s life–homework, school drama, and all that good stuff that comes with adolescence.

At this age, youths haven’t experienced enough to understand their situations fully. Children and trauma are complicated. It’s not uncommon for someone experiencing trauma to try and “act normal.” So how do you help a child that’s experienced trauma? You validate their feelings. If it made them feel bad, it was most likely bad. If they felt humiliated or violated, they were probably right to feel those feelings. 

It can be hard for an adolescent to trust their instinctive feelings when those feelings are looked down upon by society. The stigma against seeking help for mental struggles–like trauma–keeps those experiencing these struggles from reaching out. It leads to many of them ignoring the feelings, which makes it even worse.

Dr. Karyn Hall, Ph.D. says, “Validating yourself is like glue for fragmented parts of your identity. Validating yourself will help you accept and better understand yourself, which leads to a stronger identity and better skills at managing intense emotions.”

As parents, we can help these children. And trauma doesn’t have to rule their lives. Make sure that your child knows they can come to you to talk without judgement. Make sure they know they can turn to you with any feelings they find confusing or conflicting.

If you believe your daughter is struggling with trauma or other mental health issues, it’s imperative to seek out guidance from a professional.

We can help your daughter

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness. We understand children and trauma, we can help.

For more information about how Solstice East helps teens struggling with trauma, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

From Generation to Generation: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Teenagers

From Generation to Generation: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Teenagers 150 150 se_admin

According to a recent article by Psych Central, a recent study has found that post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers may be transmitted to children of holocaust survivors. New research has found that both Holocaust survivors and their offspring show similar genetic changes at the same site, a stress-related gene that has been linked to post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers.

It has not been unknown that the children of traumatized people are at increased risk for post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers, as well as mood and anxiety disorders. This new research suggests that paternal trauma is a relevant contributor to offspring biology.

The Research

One of the most intensively studied groups to be studied in regards to post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers caused by parent trauma, is the group of children of survivors of the Nazi concentration camps. From this work, researchers have been growing evidence and their data by evaluating other studies that have been done.

The researchers examined blood samples of 32 Holocaust survivors and 22 of their adult children for methylation of intron 7, a specific region within the FKBP5 gene. The researchers also studied Jewish parent-offspring pairs as a control group.

The analysis revealed that both Holocaust survivors and their offspring show genetic changes at the same site of FKBP5 intron 7, but in the opposite direction: Holocaust survivors had 10 percent higher methylation than the control parents, while the Holocaust offspring had 7.7 percent lower methylation than the control offspring.

The Meaning of this Research

Researchers state:

“The observation that the changes in parent and child are in opposing directions suggests that children of traumatized parents are not simply born with a PTSD-like biology [post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers]. They may inherit traits that promote resilience as well as vulnerability.”

This research highlights the need for parents to be more aware of their children’s mental health if they, as parents, have suffered a traumatic experience in their lifetime. If you or your child are dealing with post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers, there are programs available that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East can help your teen, please call 828-484-9946.

Helping Heal Trauma Through Residential Treatment for Teens

Helping Heal Trauma Through Residential Treatment for Teens 150 150 se_admin

Trauma can make it hard for a teenager to move through daily life. It can hinder their learning, focus, and even their joy. Trauma has the power to trigger further mental health challenges like depression or anxiety. When it gets to this point for a teen, residential treatment for teens offers a unique opportunity to overcome that trauma.

What is residential treatment?

Residential treatment for teens temporarily removes struggling youth from the distractions of the outside world and provide them with a safe environment to heal. In this safe, supervised environment with trained staff, teens receive intensive therapeutic treatment for the challenges they’re facing individually. Often these challenges have to do with serious behavioral and emotional problems–some brought about by trauma.

To treat these challenges, programs usually include a comprehensive evaluation and individualized treatment plan in order to give each adolescent the best care possible. Residential treatment for teens often includes a combination of individual, group, and family therapy.

How is trauma treated in residential treatment?

In residential treatment for teens, many diagnoses and issues are typically treated–trauma is just one of them. Since trauma usually comes with other complications (anxiety, depression, etc.), the fact that residential treatment for teens can treat many problems is extremely helpful. This way, the program is flexible enough to fit the needs of many different students.

Problems that often arise with serious trauma in teens include self-harm, aggression, substance abuse, low self-esteem, depression, and more. To treat trauma in residential treatment for teens, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) are commonly used.

CBT is used to get a teen to revisit a trauma and change the thoughts surrounding it. Many traumatic experiences cause teens to begin thinking thoughts like, “The world is extremely dangerous and I’ll never be safe.” You can imagine how much anxiety that would produce. CBT works to remove the intense fear produced by traumatic memories and experiences. Teens going through CBT talk about their experiences, how they feel about them, what that makes them think, and teaches them ways to calm themselves at their own pace.

EDMR is often used in combination with CBT. Its purpose is to also remove the fear associated with traumatic memories.  

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for teens

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, teenage girl body image issues, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about Solstice East’s residential treatment for teens, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

Coping with Grief: Understanding Grieving Styles 

Coping with Grief: Understanding Grieving Styles  150 150 se_admin

Coping with grief  is a difficult task. Many of us have different methods for coping with grief. A recent article by Psychology Today discussed how boys and girls handle grief differently. In the book Grief Beyond Gender: Understandings the Ways Men and Women Mourn, Dr. Terry Martin discusses the two patterns of grieving.

Styles of Grief

The first style of coping with grief is an intuitive pattern where individuals experience and express grief in an effective way. In this pattern, grieving individuals find strategies that are focused toward the expression of affect. The second pattern of coping with grief, is one that is labeled instrumental. Here, grief is experienced physically, such as in a restlessness or thought. Here the strategies individuals use tend to be, cognitive and active as well.

Some individuals may show a mix of patterns that draw from both intuitive and instrumental reactions and responses in the ways that individuals experience, express, and adapt to coping with grief. Other individuals may show inconsistencies between the ways that grief is experienced and expressed. These inconsistent patterns are labeled as dissonant.

As society we believe that there is a clear relation between gender and coping with grief, but this has been shown to not necessarily be true. The instrumental pattern of dissonant, is typical in the way many men grieve, due to contemporary patterns of male socialization. Women also may exhibit an instrumental style. And many women and men represent grievers who demonstrate more intuitive patterns. Clearly, patterns are influenced by gender but not determined by it.

Tips on Coping with Grief

If you find yourself have difficulty coping with grief, here are some tips on how to deal with grief in a healthy and productive way.

  • Listen. Don’t ignore your emotions–if you need to cry, that’s fine; if you need to sob, that’s fine; if you need to talk to someone, that’s fine. The important thing is to listen to what your body and feelings are trying to tell you.
  • Breathe. Deep breaths help trigger the parasympathetic nervous system, helping you calm yourself down when things get tough.
  • Be Aware. When dealing with teen grief, don’t just float through the days; take a moment to be mindful of what’s happening currently to you and others around you.
  • Cry. There’s a huge stigma against crying, but it’s your body’s way of coping and instead of avoiding it when you feel it coming, let it out.
  • Enjoy. Try to notice the small things that improve your day, like the taste of coffee or hitting 3 green lights in a row.
  • Don’t Be Hard on Yourself. Don’t think about other’s expectations of you, just your own. Be realistic and stop thinking about what you should do for other people–focus on you.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

The Benefits of Community-Based Care in Residential Treatment Facilities

The Benefits of Community-Based Care in Residential Treatment Facilities 150 150 se_admin

No one wants to feel alone. Especially if you’re struggling with a mental health issue and you are also a teenager. Finding a group of people who accept you for who you are and who are looking out for your best interests is one of the best things that can happen to someone struggling with mental health issues. Community-based care at residential treatment facilities can offer that sense of community which can really promote healing and self-confidence.

Why Community-Based Care In Residential Treatment Facilities Is Effective

Community-based care, like what you’d find in residential treatment facilities, is so effective because of the level of support found there. Teens who attend residential treatment facilities find  themselves in a structured community environment where each and every one of their needs are taken care of. 

In such a milieu, teens are supported every step of the way by their peers, mentors, and therapists. Community-based care in residential treatment facilities can improve a teen’s overall social skills and can boost their self esteem and self confidence tenfold

At residential treatment facilities with structured communities, teens feel like they have a place in the community. Before entering into treatment, they may not have felt that way about themselves. Structured community environments prepare teens to transition back home into their community by teaching a variety of life skills that can be used throughout a resident’s life.

Eliminating Stigma in Residential Treatment Facilities

Our society has continued to enforce a stigma around mental health and those who struggle with mental health issues. Community-based residential treatment facilities that encourage community involvement through community service and other activities help to eliminate this stigma within the community that residential treatment facilities are located in.

When teens go out and participate in community service activities, they interact with people from all walks of life in their community. Through these interactions, members of the community can see that those struggling with mental health issues are just normal people. This helps eliminate the stigma. Of course, we still have a long way to go before the stigma is eliminated altogether, but baby steps are important.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-17, helps struggling teen girls find success in a community-based environment.

For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058 today.

 

Passed Through Generations: Recent Research On Inherited Family Trauma

Passed Through Generations: Recent Research On Inherited Family Trauma 150 150 se_admin

The saying goes – time heals all wounds. However, when it comes to trauma within the family, this may not be true. More and more research is coming out which shows that inherited family trauma can be extremely emotionally damaging to family members long after the emotional trauma has occurred.

Children and grandchildren can experience the effects of trauma experienced by their mothers and grandmothers. These effects can come in the form of depression, self harming behaviors, and other mental health struggles. 

How do people inherit family trauma?

A 2014 study which explored why people can feel the effects of past family trauma uncovered a piece of the puzzle about the physiological processes which underlie inherited family trauma.

Researchers in this study identified a key component surrounding inherited family trauma – short RNA molecules. Our DNA contains a large number of short RNA molecules which are known as microRNAs. They help regulate how many copies of specific proteins are made within DNA.

Short RNA molecules affected by family trauma

In the 2014 study, researchers studied mice who experienced some sort of trauma earlier in their lives. They then compared these mice to other mice who had never experienced traumatic conditions.

The mice who had experienced traumatic conditions prior to the experiment started behaving strangely. Many of the mice began losing their natural aversion to bright lights and open spaces. Others began behaving in a depressive way. These behaviors were transferred from generation to generation through sperm, even though the offspring had never experienced the traumatic event themselves.

Through their observations, they found that stress related to traumatic events changed the amount of microRNA found in the sperm, brain, and blood of the mice.  They found larger amounts of certain microRNA in the traumatized mice and a lower amount in the corresponding tissues of the control mice.

Within the offspring of the mice who had experienced trauma, insulin and blood sugar levels were much lower than the offspring of the control mice. This finding was very important to the researchers because it showed that traumatic experiences can affect metabolism and behaviors in the long term. Those changes were also shown to be hereditary. Researchers found that these physiological changes could also be found  in the third generation of mice, at times.

So what does this mean for inherited family trauma in humans?

Researchers are currently studying what the effects of short RNAs in inherited family trauma within humans. Because of their findings within mice, they are hoping that this knowledge can be used to eventually develop a blood test for humans in order to prevent future mental health struggles.

Is your daughter struggling with trauma?

Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-17, can help your daughter struggling with trauma get the help she needs.

For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058 today!