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Teen Girl Issues

Avoiding Anxiety in Teens

Avoiding Anxiety in Teens 150 150 se_admin

With anxiety being one of the most common mental health issues found in the general population, avoiding anxiety in teens can be challenging. While medication, therapy, and the support of loved ones can help, anxiety in teens is often something that will follow them throughout life. As a result, worry and irrational fear are a constant part of their lives. A recent article by Bustle discusses 3 situations that should be avoided when dealing with anxiety in teens.

It’s extremely important that individuals suffering from anxiety in teens not avoid every situation that gives them anxiety—doing so can actually make anxiety in teens worse, and cause them to miss out on important opportunities. However, it’s important that teens not push themselves to a breaking point.

Anxiety in Teens: 3 Situations That Should Be Avoided

  1. Toxic Environments. Teens spend 40 hours a week at school, so it’s incredibly difficult when the environment is toxic. Bullying or social issues among peers can especially cause anxiety in teens. Many teens who suffer from this report having symptoms including sleep problems, trouble concentrating, and anxiety. If teens are experiencing a toxic environment, they should discuss with their teachers or advisors about switching seats in class or avoiding people that are causing them distress.
  2. Triggering Living Situations. When anxiety in teens is present, teens often have to face fears on a daily basis. Triggers like public speaking, driving, or meeting new people are things that individuals with anxiety need to push themselves to do, otherwise they let the disorder win. Living with anxiety in teens is often incredibly exhausting, because normal activities that are east for most teens require significantly more effort from those with anxiety. Ensuring that the home environment is a safe space is essential. Of course, no living situation is perfect, but eliminating potential anxiety triggers in the home can help reduce anxiety on a daily basis.
  3. Spending Too Much Time Alone. While there’s a lot of value in alone time, it’s important to be maintain social relationships. Anxiety in teens can cause individuals to feel the need to hide from the world. This is often due to an excess in negative thoughts. When people with anxiety are left alone with these negative thoughts, it ca be harder for them to control them and maintain a healthy life. When symptoms of anxiety are high, teens should consider spending more time with loved ones or peers, instead of hiding out.

If your teen is struggling with anxiety, there are programs that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

Parenting Tips: Dealing with Teen Girl Relationship Problems

Parenting Tips: Dealing with Teen Girl Relationship Problems 150 150 se_admin

If you have an adolescent aged daughter, then you probably know all about teen girl relationship problems. Teen girls are dramatic and sneaky–they can turn to toxic methods such as gossiping behind each other’s backs or sending mean anonymous messages online.

They’re complicated and as the parent, it’s important for you to help guide your daughter through relationship issues with friends–or even romantic interests. Without giving her some advice or foundation for healthy relationships, she’s likely to struggle more than is necessary.

A strong foundation and support for teen girl relationship problems

Teen girl relationship problems are unavoidable, but the way they’re handled can vary. As teens grow into adulthood, they’re continue to face relationship issues, but the difference is whether they learn how to deal with them more effectively or not.

Relationships are what support us and nourish us–they’re incredibly important for overall health. Knowing how to build them, take care of them, and mend them are essential life skills.

A strong foundation is critical to continuing to nurture and build relationships throughout life. This foundation is usually built by the parents. This is why it’s important to be there to support your teen through their difficult experiences, whether that’s young love or getting stabbed in the back by their best friend.

You not only have to model what a good relationship with others looks like, but you also have to make it known that you’re there to talk. That may seem like it doesn’t need to be said, but many teens feel as if they can’t go to their parents to talk in times of need.

Don’t push it, but let it be known that you’re available for advice or just to listen any time. If they do come to you, then try to think back to what you went through as a teenager and offer up some gentle advice on how to handle situations.

Opening this channel of discussion will let your teen know that if they’re really struggling with something, they can seek you out. Even for more serious issues, such as bullying or mental health problems.

If you believe your daughter may be struggling with more than just a couple of teen girl relationship problems, it’s important to seek out a professional for advice.

Solstice East is here for your family

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of troubled girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, teen girl relationship problems, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how we help with teen girl relationship problems at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Be the Rock: Four Practices For Better Handling Your Out Of Control Teenage Daughter

Be the Rock: Four Practices For Better Handling Your Out Of Control Teenage Daughter 150 150 se_admin

If your daughter is struggling with defiant behaviors, it can feel like things get out of control very quickly. Here are four ways to handle out of control behavior.

Establish the root cause

Chances are, if you’re experiencing an out of control teenage daughter, you experienced her stages of anger and rebellion in the recent past. These stages are a progression with a common origin, or root cause, which may include:

  • Lacks sense of belonging, or feels unloved and unwanted
  • Unaware of personal strengths and passions
  • Feels inadequate or unheard by others
  • Has unresolved anger building up

Set clear boundaries

…and stick to them!  Set the clear expectations of the house and ask your partner for their dedicated support.  Offer verbal reprimands and appreciation, respectively and regularly.  Be prepared for her manipulation in response to you holding a firm line, and don’t be pulled into an argument or power struggle.  Restate the expectation and leave the room.  Be the solid, unmoving rock that she pushes against, and meet her with understanding and compassion.

Beware of attention-seeking behavior

It is imperative that you respond to her behavior neutrally – remove judgment, fear and anger so as not to . You truly have to let go and allow her the space to hit rock bottom. This is not giving up on your child.  Quite the contrary – experience is the most powerful ways she learns, and you’ll be there to support her when she’s ready to accept help.

Take care of yourself

You can’t be expected to run a household without adequate self care.  Don’t sacrifice personal interests, activities or sleep in the midst of your daughter’s struggles. Keep your life or track and set a positive example.  Most importantly, stop blaming yourself for your child’s behavior.  It’s not about fault, it’s about taking responsibility – and if you’re researching how to help her, you’ve done that much.

Solstice East is here for your family

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of troubled girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, social media addiction, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how we help teens at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Resolving a Parent-Teenager Conflict the Right Way

Resolving a Parent-Teenager Conflict the Right Way 150 150 se_admin

When a parent-teenager conflict arises, many parents are at a loss for what to do. Some respond to their teen’s anger with more anger, some respond with extreme consequences, some don’t respond at all—each of these can have negative effects, though.

There are certain ways to approach a parent-teenager conflict that have a higher percentage of success than the usual ones, but they tend to take more patience and more restraint.

How to effectively deal with a parent-teenager conflict

Parent-teenager conflict isn’t rare—if you’ve ever raised a teen or are raising one, you know that for sure. In conflicts, which will happen no matter what you do, it’s important to build a trusting, open relationship that involves respect. Respect in an argument is one of the most helpful ways to get through it and have less of them. Tips on how to resolve a parent-teenager conflict include:

  • Don’t minimize the issue. One of the go-to things for parents is to say, “You’re too young to understand now” or “One day, this won’t matter.” This will most likely just lead to them lashing out more since you’re essentially telling them that their issues don’t matter. Instead, say things like, “Yes, this makes sense to me.”
  • Show genuine interest. If you’ve recently had a fight and are looking for a way to bridge the gap and move forward, show interest in something you know they like. Are they really into old films? Offer an olive branch by asking if they want to go see a movie at the old cinema in town.
  • Do not humiliate. When we’re angry, we say things we don’t mean—and that can include trying to humiliate the other. For example, let’s say your daughter failed her math test. Instead of telling her how much of a failure she is, ask her what went wrong. Sit down and just listen to her reasons. Maybe she’s going through a tough time and needs guidance—you won’t get that information by humiliating her.
  • Do not just walk away. One mistake is to completely walk away from an argument and never revisit it, at least not without being forced into it. When you leave a conflict unresolved, it will eventually snowball into another conflict, that’s why it’s important to resolve. Studies show that more conflicts arise when the withdrawal method is used.
  • Explain your opposition. “Because I said so,” are the famous last words of a parent-teenager conflict. The teen storms to their room and slams the door, never knowing why their parent said no. This is a mistake. Instead, explain your reasoning and if they don’t like it, then they can take the time to come to terms with that. Don’t use hostility, though. If you said no to your daughter going to an unsupervised party, for example, a good explanation would be that you don’t feel comfortable without a parent being in attendance.

Overall, it’s important to come at conflicts with love and support. Stay calm, try to see where your daughter is coming from, and speak from a place of care.

If you believe your daughter may be struggling with a mental health issue, it’s essential to reach out to a professional.

Solstice East is here for your family

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of troubled girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, parent-teenager conflict, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how we help resolve a parent-teenager conflict at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Rebellious Teenage Girl: Brain Scans May Reveal Hidden Risks

Rebellious Teenage Girl: Brain Scans May Reveal Hidden Risks 150 150 se_admin

What drives a rebellious teenage girl continues to elude parents all over the planet–but we may have gotten a step closer to understanding what drives teenage rebellion pretty recently. Brain scans give us a deeper look into how the adolescent brain functions, allowing us to further understand why certain teens turn towards disruptive behavior while others don’t.

Brain scans shed light on ADHD

You’ve probably heard of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at some point since it affects more than 1 in 20 young people under the age of 18. A new study published in The Lancet Psychiatry found some interesting information concerning the brain and ADHD.

In the study, researchers looked at brain scans of over 1,700 individuals with ADHD and over 1,500 individuals without ADHD. The brain scans revealed that the brain volume of those with ADHD was lower than that of those without. Specifically, there was a large difference in the size of the amygdala–the section of the brain that has to do with emotions.

Some believe that this information will lead to faster and easier diagnoses along with a better understanding of how ADHD operates in the brain. ADHD can most certainly cause behaviors commonly perceived in a rebellious teenage girl, making this a significant find.

Could brain scans help predict drug use?

A new study published in Nature Communications may have discovered a new way to predict whether someone will be more prone to drug abuse or not.

The study included almost 150 adolescents who had never before taken drugs. They took those individuals and monitored their brains while they performed different tasks that could win them money–which were designed to light up the “reward” section of the brain.

It was found that individuals who had less brain activity towards getting a “cash” reward were more likely to turn to recreational drug use two years later.

While there’s still a lot of theory surrounding what this information means, researchers are optimistic that it may help in identifying more “vulnerable teenagers” and therefore allow parents to intervene before the issues even begin.

A rebellious teenage girl will often turn to drugs as a means of either coping with difficult emotions or rebelling against rules. A way of identifying if a teen is more likely to turn to drugs than others could be extremely helpful in intervention techniques.

Solstice East can help your rebellious teenage girl

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, bullying, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. We strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how we can help your rebellious teenage girl at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Living with Trauma: Overcoming PTSD from Childhood

Living with Trauma: Overcoming PTSD from Childhood 150 150 se_admin

In movies, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is often the burden of army veterans coming home from lengthy wars. In reality, however, PTSD is far more complex. PTSD can occur in anyone, at any age. Living with PTSD from childhood, for instance, can be extremely taxing – especially considering that, unlike its adult counterpart, PTSD from childhood can have symptoms that are not commonly associated with PTSD. As a parent, there are few things more difficult than watching a child suffer. Fortunately, there are several tips that can help ease the situation.

Different Responses

Trauma is one of the most difficult concepts to define. Although mental illness is rarely easy to understand, certain patterns can be observed with most disorders. Depression or bipolar disorder, for example, come with a range of symptoms that appear most often. While each person’s individual situation might be different, it typically fits under the overarching umbrella of their diagnosis. With PTSD, however, matters become more nebulous.

PTSD is a response to trauma. However, most people who experience trauma do not develop PTSD. As a matter of fact, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, “Studies show that about 15% to 43% of girls and 14% to 43% of boys go through at least one trauma. Of those children and teens who have had a trauma, 3% to 15% of girls and 1% to 6% of boys develop PTSD.” Moreover, to further complicate matters, no two traumas are alike. The very definition of trauma depends on each person – and there are indicators that this is guided as much by biology as circumstance.

PTSD in children takes on a different shape than PTSD in adults. Where an adult might experience flashbacks, children typically put events in the wrong order or think that there were signs that could have led them to prevent the traumatic event in the first place. An adult typically withdraws from everybody, while a child might withdraw from all but a small, tightly-knit group. With age, a child might become disruptive, have problems in school, and be more likely to experiment with substances.

Finding Help for PTSD From Childhood

Perhaps the most important thing a parent can do to help their child struggling with PTSD is to be available to talk and discuss the situation – should the child want support. PTSD can spark unrelated fears in a child, so parents should be prepared for seemingly unrelated topics of conversation as well.

If your child is exhibiting symptoms of PTSD, it may be time to contact professional help. Solstice East helps young women ages 14-18 deal with trauma. For more information, call (855) 672-7058 today!

What’s Causing the Increased Need for Anxiety Treatment for Teens?

What’s Causing the Increased Need for Anxiety Treatment for Teens? 150 150 se_admin

There’s a looming question for professionals and parents: why is the need for anxiety treatment for teens increasing? Can we just better identify it now and that’s why there are “more” teens with anxiety, or is it a deeper issue that has to do with school and society? Psychology Today recently published an article discussing the different possibilities for the increase in anxiety treatment for teens and why it’s needed.

Why are teens more anxious?

The level of anxiety in teens today is much higher than what it used to be, anxiety treatment for teens has increased exponentially. Researchers are extremely interested in why and how it got to be this way. There’s a load of theories and it’s likely there’s no easy answer out there. In the article, two main outlooks are discussed, over-diagnosing or a more stressful environment.

One explanation could be over-diagnosing or doctors being too quick to slap “anxiety” on something that may just be healthy worry. But before we feed into that theory, there’s large evidence that it’s more the environment around our teens that’s fueling this new need for anxiety treatment for teens. Take a moment to think about it.

On average, teens don’t get 8 hours of sleep–they don’t get even close to it actually. So, first off, they’re sleep deprived. Next, they have a lot more weight on their shoulders to do well in school so they can get into college–which they need scholarships, too, because college is insanely expensive. Then, on top of that, colleges want you to not just have good grades, but they also want you to be active in the community and sports life. With the workload that teens have nowadays, that’s really difficult to do. And to just make the anxiety worse, about half of teens have a part-time job and about 5 percent work over 20 hours a week at that job.

Oh, but there’s more. Today, we’re more connected than ever to what’s happening around the world; the beauty, the culture, the politics–and also the violence. Teens spend more time on their devices than they do sleeping, which means they’re most definitely getting exposed to this violence that’s happening all over the world. With all the stress of daily school life, a fear of violence can be the straw that breaks the camel’s back.

So, as I said, there’s no right or perfect answer–it’s probably a mix of the theories above and even more. If you believe someone your know could benefit from anxiety treatment for teens, it’s important to seek out a professional for further guidance.

Solstice East offers anxiety treatment for teens

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about anxiety treatment for teens at Solstice East, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

Deep Wounds: The Long Lasting Effects of Childhood Bullying

Deep Wounds: The Long Lasting Effects of Childhood Bullying 150 150 se_admin

Most of us have been bullied once or twice in our lives. Maybe for some, they were the ones doing the bullying. As a child it may have seemed like harmless fun, but according to a recent article by Science Daily, new research has found that the effects of childhood bullying have the equivalent negative psychological effects on girls as severe physical or sexual abuse.

The Research

A study which involved 480 college freshman through seniors, indicated that the detrimental effects of childhood bullying may linger for years. Due to this it can cause negative affect’s on youth’s mental health will into early adulthood.

Participants in the study were surveyed about their exposure to a variety of traumatic experiences—including childhood bullying, cyberbullying and crimes such as robbery, sexual assault, and domestic and community violence—from birth through age 17. Students also reported on their psychological functioning and symptoms of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. The students who experienced childhood bullying reported higher levels of mental health problems than their peers.

The Results

Females in particular struggles with the effects of childhood bullying, and reported significantly greater levels of depression, anxiety and PTSD than their male peers. Dorthy Espelage, an Educational psychologist and conductor of the study states:

“The prevalence of psychological distress in children who have been bullied is well-documented, and this research suggests that college students’ psychological distress ay be connected in part to their perceptions of past childhood bullying victimization experiences.”

Practitioners, in collaboration with school officials, need to make more of an effort to develop and put in place programs that decrease the negative effects of childhood bullying. Creating clubs or programs that could teach children suffering from trauma how to feel confident, safe, and empowered could help eliminate later mental health issues from the effects of childhood bullying.

If your child is experiencing negative effects of childhood bullying, there are programs available that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East can help, please call 828-484-9946!

Fighting Teen Attitude Problems: Olympian soccer player sets example for teens

Fighting Teen Attitude Problems: Olympian soccer player sets example for teens 150 150 se_admin

According to a recent article by CNN, United States Olympic soccer player Alex Morgan is setting a great example for teens around the world. Alex Morgan and the United States Women’s Olympic soccer team suffered an unfortunate defeat in this year’s 2016 Olympic games against Sweden in the quarterfinals. The US team has been three-time World Cup champions and 2012 Olympic gold medalists. When they were defeated—meaning they wouldn’t see an Olympic medal at all—it was extremely unsettling. For some, losing like this can lead to negative attitudes, but Alex Morgan represented her team with positive spirits and became an excellent role model against teen attitude problems.

The Fight Against Teen Attitude Problems

Alex Morgan stated:

“This loss has probably been the toughest of my career so far. We had such high expectations for ourselves…but I feel like it was a wake-up call.”

Morgan said that while the loss was a “humbling experience,” she wouldn’t let it define her, her teammates or their careers. After the loss she promoted positive attitudes about the loss on social media. For many teens, not having teen attitude problems related to losses in sports can be difficult. Alex Morgans positive attitude shows all teens that teen attitude problems are not acceptable no matter the situation. Keeping a positive attitude is essential for maintaining a good wellbeing.

Showing Youth How to Stay Positive

Morgan has since become a spokeswoman for the #LikeAGirl campaign by Always. She says the most important thing for young athletes to remember is to learn, grow and never forget a tough loss. She states:

“It wouldn’t be sports if challenges didn’t come in our path every once in a while, or even more than every once in a while, but I feel like it’s most important to feel like you are encouraged to keep going. That’s why I put out a tweet right after losing the game, because although I was disappointed and heartbroken, I felt like it wasn’t a game that was going to define me or hurt my confidence, and I wanted to kind of show girls that they’re not alone with challenges that come up.”

If you or your child are suffering from teen attitude problems, there are programs out there that can help!

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

From Generation to Generation: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Teenagers

From Generation to Generation: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Teenagers 150 150 se_admin

According to a recent article by Psych Central, a recent study has found that post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers may be transmitted to children of holocaust survivors. New research has found that both Holocaust survivors and their offspring show similar genetic changes at the same site, a stress-related gene that has been linked to post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers.

It has not been unknown that the children of traumatized people are at increased risk for post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers, as well as mood and anxiety disorders. This new research suggests that paternal trauma is a relevant contributor to offspring biology.

The Research

One of the most intensively studied groups to be studied in regards to post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers caused by parent trauma, is the group of children of survivors of the Nazi concentration camps. From this work, researchers have been growing evidence and their data by evaluating other studies that have been done.

The researchers examined blood samples of 32 Holocaust survivors and 22 of their adult children for methylation of intron 7, a specific region within the FKBP5 gene. The researchers also studied Jewish parent-offspring pairs as a control group.

The analysis revealed that both Holocaust survivors and their offspring show genetic changes at the same site of FKBP5 intron 7, but in the opposite direction: Holocaust survivors had 10 percent higher methylation than the control parents, while the Holocaust offspring had 7.7 percent lower methylation than the control offspring.

The Meaning of this Research

Researchers state:

“The observation that the changes in parent and child are in opposing directions suggests that children of traumatized parents are not simply born with a PTSD-like biology [post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers]. They may inherit traits that promote resilience as well as vulnerability.”

This research highlights the need for parents to be more aware of their children’s mental health if they, as parents, have suffered a traumatic experience in their lifetime. If you or your child are dealing with post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers, there are programs available that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East can help your teen, please call 828-484-9946.