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Mental Issues

From Generation to Generation: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Teenagers

From Generation to Generation: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Teenagers 150 150 se_admin

According to a recent article by Psych Central, a recent study has found that post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers may be transmitted to children of holocaust survivors. New research has found that both Holocaust survivors and their offspring show similar genetic changes at the same site, a stress-related gene that has been linked to post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers.

It has not been unknown that the children of traumatized people are at increased risk for post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers, as well as mood and anxiety disorders. This new research suggests that paternal trauma is a relevant contributor to offspring biology.

The Research

One of the most intensively studied groups to be studied in regards to post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers caused by parent trauma, is the group of children of survivors of the Nazi concentration camps. From this work, researchers have been growing evidence and their data by evaluating other studies that have been done.

The researchers examined blood samples of 32 Holocaust survivors and 22 of their adult children for methylation of intron 7, a specific region within the FKBP5 gene. The researchers also studied Jewish parent-offspring pairs as a control group.

The analysis revealed that both Holocaust survivors and their offspring show genetic changes at the same site of FKBP5 intron 7, but in the opposite direction: Holocaust survivors had 10 percent higher methylation than the control parents, while the Holocaust offspring had 7.7 percent lower methylation than the control offspring.

The Meaning of this Research

Researchers state:

“The observation that the changes in parent and child are in opposing directions suggests that children of traumatized parents are not simply born with a PTSD-like biology [post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers]. They may inherit traits that promote resilience as well as vulnerability.”

This research highlights the need for parents to be more aware of their children’s mental health if they, as parents, have suffered a traumatic experience in their lifetime. If you or your child are dealing with post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in teenagers, there are programs available that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East can help your teen, please call 828-484-9946.

Wellbeing in Teens: It’s Okay to Not Be Okay

Wellbeing in Teens: It’s Okay to Not Be Okay 150 150 se_admin

According to a recent article by CNN, maintaining wellbeing in teens can be difficult and that’s okay. In a previous study, researchers studied human happiness and wellbeing in teens. They found that maintaining wellbeing in teens and human happiness isn’t always possible. They found that the saying “You can’t have it all,” is quite true for individuals overall wellbeing.

Happiness Comes in Different Forms

Part of the reasoning is that happiness isn’t just one thing. Jennifer Hecht is a philosopher who studies the history of happiness. Hecht proposes that we all experience different types of happiness, but these aren’t necessarily complementary. She believes that some types of happiness, may actually conflict with one another. Basically, that having too much of one type of happiness may undermine our ability to have enough of the others, making it impossible to “have it all.”

How Our Brains Process Happiness

Maintaining wellbeing in teens is also confounded by the way our brains process the experience of happiness. We’ve all started a sentence with the phrase “Won’t it be great when…” (I go to college, fall in love, have kids, etc.).  We hardly hear people saying “Isn’t this great, right now?” Our past and future aren’t always better than the present, yet our brains continue to process it this way. These are the elements that limit our happiness and wellbeing in teens.

We as a society, work extremely hard to reach a goal, anticipating the happiness it will bring. Unfortunately, according to this research, after a brief fix we quickly slide back to our baseline, ordinary way-of-being and start chasing the next thing we believe will “finally” make us happy. While this may seem depressing, the reality is that dissatisfaction with the present and dreams of the future are what keep us motivated, while warm fuzzy memories of the past reassure us that the feeling we seek can be had. According to the researchers, perpetual bliss would completely undermine our will to accomplish anything at all.

Realistic Happiness

Researchers hope that this news won’t be depressing, but will provide more of a realistic mindset. Understanding that it’s impossible to have happiness in all aspects of life will hopefully help individuals enjoy and better appreciate the happiness that has touched them.

If you have a child who is struggling to achieve wellbeing in teens, there are programs that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946.

The Need for a Teenage Depression Test

The Need for a Teenage Depression Test 150 150 se_admin

A recent article by Richmond discusses a girl’s story of battling depression and the need for a teenage depression test. For Cameron Gallagher, who lived with depression, the pain of her struggle was almost unbearable. It was extremely difficult on her family and friends watching her battling depression and not knowing what to do. Cameron died suddenly at age 16 from an undiscovered heart condition after running a half-marathon, her difficulties provided the inspiration to help other teens seek help and get a teenage depression test.

A Quest Towards Change

Cameron’s family decided to turn this quest into a 5K race, a foundation, and a program to build awareness and support for individuals needing a teenage depression test and those battling other mental health issues. Research by the 2015 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey has shown, that nearly 30 percent of high school students said they had felt sad or hopeless almost every day for two or more weeks within the past year. The students also stated that during these times they had difficulties staying active in certain usual activities they participated in. The study found that percentages were similar at each grade level.

Among female students, the percentage reporting symptoms of depression was nearly 40 percent overall. Grace Gallagher, Cameron’s mother states:

“Love means doing the hard stuff. Sometimes it’s taking you to a doctor’s appointment that you don’t want to go to. There were some nights that were really, really hard—a lot of tear and not just from Cameron.”

The Importance of Seeking Help

Cameron’s story is an impactful message to all families about the importance of seeking a teenage depression test and therapy. At such a young age, it can seem impossible to understand what you’re going through. With the stigma on mental health, it is essential that teens feel supported and capable of speaking up about their mental health struggles.

Don’t wait, let Cameron’s story be the inspiration to seek the help you need. If you or your child are in need of a teenage depression test, there are programs available that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East can help your teen, please call 828-484-9946!

 

A New Study on ADHD in Teen Girls

A New Study on ADHD in Teen Girls 150 150 se_admin

According to a recent article by Scientific American, new research has found that ADHD in teen girls may share a genetic root with autism and OCD. The three conditions have symptoms in common, such as impulsivity. According to these new findings, they also share a brain signature.

The Research on Links Between Mental Illnesses

The researchers have found that they brain layouts of ADHD in teen girls, OCD, and autism all share a disruption in the structure of the corpus callosum. The corpus callosum is a bundle of nerve fibers that links the brain’s left and right hemispheres. Researchers believe that the unique aspects of each condition might arise from other brain attributes, such as differences in the connections between neurons.

The researchers examined the brains of 71 children with autism, 31 with ADHD in teen girls, 36 with OCD, and 62 non-diagnosed children using diffusion tensor imaging. This method provides a picture of the brain’s white matter, meaning the long fibers that connect nerve cells, by measuring the diffusion of water across these fibers.

The Results

The researchers saw widespread disruptions in white matter structure among children with all three of these conditions. They also found that children who showed the least independence in attention, social communication skills, obsessive behaviors and ability to perform everyday tasks had the most significant disruptions in white matter.

The only areas that looked alike in the brains for ADHD in teen girls and the other conditions were in the corpus callosum, suggesting that disruptions of this may underlie the features the conditions have in common. Stephanie Ameis, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto states:

“What’s interesting is that (the corpus callosum) is one of the first tracts to develop and it’s the largest in the brain. So it could be a tract that creates vulnerability for these neurodevelopmental conditions.”

If you or your child are dealing with ADHD in teen girls, there are programs available that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

The Importance of the Milieu at a Residential Treatment Center for Girls

The Importance of the Milieu at a Residential Treatment Center for Girls 150 150 se_admin

“Milieu”: For any parent searching for help for their struggling teen at a residential treatment center, this is a word you may come across often. Milieu refers to an individual’s social culture or environment. The milieu of a residential treatment center provides an opportunity for social growth and improvement. At Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls, the milieu is an important aspect of each students’ therapeutic process.

Why is the milieu important?

At Solstice East, milieu therapy helps create positive transformative experiences for students. In an environment where everyone in the community is invested in creating lasting change, struggling girls can find the support they need to make positive decisions. The community atmosphere at Solstice East includes everyone on campus – from students to staff. Here are some other ways Solstice East uses the milieu on campus to help girls find success:

  1. Community roles: Each member of the Solstice East community is assigned a designated role. These roles help contribute to carrying out daily tasks within the program. Roles range from assisting in the kitchen to creating a laundry schedule on campus. The community roles within the milieu help teaches teens responsibility, gives them a valued role within the community, and boosts feelings of self-confidence.
  2. Building relationship and social skills: At Solstice East, many of our students build trusting friendships. The community environment at Solstice East provides a unique opportunity for teens struggling to make and keep friends. Through the guidance of designated mentors and therapeutic staff, strong relationships are formed with peers and relationships with family members are rebuilt.
  3. Home-like setting of campus: The small, comfortable setting of campus allows for a close knit community feel. As a residential treatment center devoted to helping girls find and achieve success, the small size of our campus allows for the personalized treatment your teen needs to heal.
  4. Collaborative team: Our residential and therapeutic staff work together to create the most nurturing, healing environment possible for students within the milieu.

Solstice East can help your child

Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your struggling  daughter achieve lasting success.
For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058.

Kanye West on Teen Depression

Kanye West on Teen Depression 150 150 se_admin

What is Teen Depression?

Teen depression is typically diagnosed if youth experience depressive symptoms for more than 2 weeks. Common symptoms of teen depression include mood swings, irritability, changes in eating habits, frequent sadness and crying, low self-esteem, and thoughts of death or suicide.

For youth experiencing teen depression, most guidelines recommend cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and other psychological therapies as treatment options. According to the recent study, an increasing number of youth with teen depression are being prescribed antidepressants.

Kanye West Opens Up on His Battle with Depression

Kanye West sat down with BBC Radio 1’s Annie Mac for an exclusive chat, discussing his botched Glastonbury performance and his state of mild depression. West states:

“I started off the show and I completely messed up the music. And me, as you can imagine by this phone call, I’m a bit of a perfectionist. So it really put me into a slightly depressed state and it put me back in the position of when I was in high school and I got fired from my job, or when I played my music for R. Kelly and he told me he was going to sign me and then three months later I didn’t have any money I couldn’t afford a haircut, I couldn’t take my girlfriend to the movies and I’m still in my momma’s bedroom, working on beats and I was that close to being signed by R. Kelly.”

West’s statement highlights how any troubled time can create symptoms of depression. Teen depression is extremely common in our society and it’s important that youth know they have help available to them. If your teen is suffering with teen depression, there are programs that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

 

Prince Harry’s Teen Struggles: Not Opening Up About Mother’s Death

Prince Harry’s Teen Struggles: Not Opening Up About Mother’s Death 150 150 se_admin

We’ve all gone through teen struggles. Teens are infamous for keeping their feelings bottled up, letting them build up and build up until–much like a volcano–they come bursting out. In a recent article by The Guardian, Prince Harry spoke about his regrets surrounding not opening up about his mother’s–Princess Diana–death earlier. She died in a car crash when he was 12 years old, but only 3 years ago did he actually begin to speak about it.

Any of us can have mental health issues

“The key message here today is that everyone can suffer from mental health. Whether you are a member of the royal family, whether you are a soldier, whether you are a sports star, whether you are a team sport, individual sport, whether you are a white van driver, whether you’re a mother, father, a child, it doesn’t really matter.” –Prince Harry

After leaving the army, Prince Harry decided to take on the stigma of mental health issues and shatter it. He founded the Invictus Games, which is for men and women injured in service. His thoughts were that these men and women are often ignored, not just their physical struggles, but their mental struggles as well. By creating the Invictus Games, it gave those wounded a chance to be celebrated by society and put out in the open for all to see.

Prince Harry’s new campaign for mental health awareness is Heads Together–which he, Prince William, and the Duchess of Cambridge run together. The point of Heads Together is not only to create a greater awareness among the public, but also to inspire those with adult and teen struggles in mental health to come forward for treatment. Without mental health, there is no physical health, and the Royal Family is trying to educate everyone about that simple fact.

Finding treatment for teen struggles

You’re not alone in this. It may feel like the world is against you and your child’s mental health issues, but there are options for your family. If you truly believe your teen struggles with mental health issues, it’s extremely important to seek out a professional for guidance on what steps to take next.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. We strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East treats teen struggles, please call 828-484-9946.

Eating Disorders in Teen Athletes

Eating Disorders in Teen Athletes 150 150 se_admin

With media today, body image in teen girls has become an increasing problem. Teens feel more pressure to fit a specific body type, which is ultimately leading to more and more issues with eating disorders in youth. As a growing number of teen girls participate in sports, health issues have begun to arise from eating disorders in teen athletes. A recent article by Reuters discussed how eating disorders in teen athletes has begun to increase, and the need for doctors and parents to be aware of the health risks.

The Female Athlete Triad

Eating disorders in teen athletes can be seen when teens exercise too much and don’t eat enough calories to maintain the amount of physical activity. The health issues associated with eating disorders in teen athletes include: disordered eating, a halt in monthly menstrual cycles known as amenorrhea, and a bone-thinning disease known as osteoporosis. These three issues are known as the female athlete triad. Girls can have just one of these problems or a combination, in varying degrees.

The Dangers of Over Training

While sports can have tremendous benefits like improved self-esteem and better physical and mental health, doctors, parents, and coaches need to be aware of eating disorder habits in teen athletes. If teens begin to train too hard, the elements of the triad can surface, which can have dangerous consequences on girl’s bodies.

Timothy Neal, a researcher with the athletic training program at Concordia University in Ann Arbor Michigan states:

“It has been my experience that coaches, parents, pediatricians and family practice physicians are not experienced in caring for athletes, and athletes themselves are not aware of the health risks unique to the triad for female athletes. Parents, athletes, pediatricians, coaches and certified athletic trainers should be aware of signs and symptoms of eating disorders, including those athletes who display signs and symptoms of anxiety, depression, anger, isolation, and other behaviors that may indicate a mental health disorder.”

Be Aware of Your Body

Being aware of your body and the signals it’s giving you is an important part of staying healthy. Teen’s and parents should be aware of the risks low-calorie intake and excessive exercise can have on the body physically and emotionally. If your worried your teen is suffering from eating disorders in teen athletes, there are programs that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

 

The Eating Disorder That Goes Undiscussed: Binge Eating In Teens

The Eating Disorder That Goes Undiscussed: Binge Eating In Teens 150 150 se_admin

Binge eating disorder is an eating disorder that not many people talk about. Stuffing your face with an entire gallon of ice cream or an entire pizza due to a recent breakup or some other emotional distress may not be the healthiest way to express emotional distress, but it certainly is not the same as binge eating in teens. Binge eating disorder is a serious mental health issue which is characterized by the consumption of large amounts of food in a very short period of time while feeling like these behaviors are out of your control.

What does binge eating in teens look like?

Unlike anorexia and bulimia, “purging” is not a characteristic of binge eating in teens.  Most people struggling with binge eating disorder are overweight or obese. There are those, however, who control their weight through dieting. 

Binge eating in teens usually occurs over a set period of time (for example, an individual may binge for 2 hours each time). Binge eaters feel like their eating is out of control during those periods of time. Some describe the experience as trance-like. They can’t stop themselves no matter how hard they try.

Like other eating disorders, binge eating disorder can be influenced negative thoughts about one’s body and stress. No one knows the exact cause of binge eating teens, but other risk factors include:

  • Family history: If someone else in your family suffers from binge eating disorder or another eating disorder, you are more likely to develop one yourself.
  • Dieting: People who have dieted frequently in the past are more at risk for binge eating disorder than infrequent dieters.
  • Being a teenager or in your 20s: The age group that is the most at risk for binge eating disorder is late teens through 20s.

Binge eating in teens is linked to psychiatric disorders like bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, and substance use.

Getting treatment for binge eating in teens

Binge eating in teens is a serious mental health issue that should be diagnosed and treated as soon as parents see the signs. Medication and talk therapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, have been known to be effective treatments for this disorder.

Sending your teen to an inpatient residential treatment facility after most of their symptoms have been treated might be the next step you teen needs to make a full recovery.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-17, can help your struggling daughter find success. Solstice East help girls struggling with depression, mild disordered eating, anxiety, and trauma-related issues.

For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058.

Childhood Obesity and the Urge for Change 

Childhood Obesity and the Urge for Change  150 150 se_admin

As a parent, getting your child to eat healthy and be active can be difficult. Some youth find the act of being healthy a chore, and often fight parents on doing it. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, obesity most often develops from ages 5 to 6 or during the teen years, and studies have shown that a child who is obese between the ages of 10 and 13 has an 80 percent chance of becoming an obese adult. A recent article by the New York Times discusses the significant health risks childhood obesity has on youth.

Effects of Childhood Obesity

Life-threatening conditions like heart disease, cancer, stroke and Type 2 diabetes are more commonly heard of effecting adults, but they can also be consequences of childhood obesity. Two new studies, conducted on over half a million children, linked a childhood obesity to an increased risk of developing colon cancer and suffering from an early stroke as adults.

When is Your Child Considered Obese

Children are generally considered obese when their B.M.I. is at or above the 95th percentile for others of the same age and sex. Currently, one-third of American children are overweight or suffering with childhood obesity. In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 18 percent of children and 21 percent of adolescents were dealing with childhood obesity.

Studies on Childhood Obesity

Many people assume that children dealing with childhood obesity won’t see the effects of major health risks until later in life, if they still struggle with obesity. But studies have shown that childhood obesity starts to effect youth early on. Dr. Stephen R. Daniels, a pediatrician at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Children’s Hospital in Denver, found that problems in many organ systems were often apparent long before adulthood. They include high blood pressure; insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes; heart-damage and high levels of cholesterol; liver disease; obstructive sleep apnea; asthma; and excess stress on the musculoskeletal system resulting in abnormal bone development, knee and hip pain, and difficulty walking.

Youth suffering from childhood obesity are also at a greater risk for developing mental health issues. Obese adolescents have higher rates of depression, which in itself can foster poor eating and exercise patterns that add to their weight issues. They’re also more likely to have poor body image and self-esteem.

Urge for Change

This information reveals the critical importance on promoting healthy eating habits and exercise patterns in all youth. Parents should encourage children to be active and make healthy decisions, without labeling them as overweight or obese. Commenting on kid’s weight can actually harm their self-esteem, increasing their unhealthy habits. It is important that parents encourage kids by changing their environment and creating opportunities for them to be active.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!