• Residential Treatment Center for Teens 14-17

Mental Health

teenage-mental-health-facilities

A Family Guide to Teenage Mental Health Facilities

A Family Guide to Teenage Mental Health Facilities 2560 1707 Admin_SE

Are you looking for teenage mental health facilities? Seeking treatment for depression may bring as much anxiety to the family as it does to the adolescent teen girl who experiences the behavioral disorder. You and your teen may require additional support. Solstice East, in North Carolina, can help assist your family in discovering the specific needs of your teen. In this short guide, we’ll consider what the families of a teenager struggling with depression and anxiety can do to help maintain their overall well-being through the process of healing. Remember that Solstice East wants to be here for you as a resource for your family during this challenging time.

Teenage Mental Health Facilities

Teenage Mental Health Facilities

Social Media Mindfulness

Regarding social media, be mindful that all media posted on the internet can become permanently available to the public. This means that in the future, posts will be searchable by the teen’s potential college, employer, political opponent, or cyberbully. Please be careful with what you choose to post about your teen. Let’s protect their privacy.

Family Support

This is probably a time when you want your teen to open up with their thoughts and feelings and so it is important to listen as patiently as possible and to be as supportive as you can.  It’s important to listen even if you disagree with what they are saying so they have a chance to let their thoughts and feelings be heard. It is important for family members to be mindful that stereotyping and blaming anyone in the family, especially the child or teen struggling with anxiety or depression, is not helpful. Try to stay constructive and do your best to avoid blame and shame. These feelings and attitudes don’t help in solving issues and do not create an open environment where children feel safe to share thoughts and feelings. Most families want to do their best to stay resourceful, creative, and to be as loving as possible to the child that is struggling.

Teenage Mental Health Facilities Guide

Teenage Mental Health Facilities Guide

Helping the Family During Teenage Rehabilitation

Family members might experience a personal increase of anxiety and depression when a loved one is experiencing behavioral issues and/or needs professional services, therapy, or treatments.

Parents or guardians, please remind yourself often that teens of all walks of life and circumstances suffer from depression.  Many people tend to think that depression only occurs as a result of major difficult life events such as divorce, the death of a sibling, or other stressful situations. It’s important to remember that depression happens to all types of people in all types of situations and that it manifests in different ways and to different degrees.

In addition, some parents lose confidence in their parenting style and abilities which may not lend to their ability to contribute to their children. Parents also must care for themselves along the way as this allows them to be better equipped to add value to the situation with their troubled teen.

Children’s Mental Health

Every family has a degree of turmoil. For children who are younger than the sibling with depression, this may be a confusing time where additional explanations are necessary to help them cope and better understand the situation. Children often need the opportunity to talk to parents and others to be able to process. When parents understand what their children are going through they can better support them through challenging times.

Teenage Mental Health Facilities

Teenage Mental Health Facilities

Extended Family Support of Teenager Girls

The extended family of the teen with mental health issues and depression can be of great value to the teen going through depression and anxiety. Depending on the family dynamic, grandparents may offer the parents support in the form of watching the other kids. This gives parents time to reflect on and discuss the situation. Parents and the teen may need time to consult with medical professionals in order to gain direction as to how to better support and direct the family.

Aunts and uncles can assist parents and the entire family unit by actively listening and offering emotional support, being involved in the adolescent’s life, babysitting younger children, or providing advice and perhaps a new perspective to both parents and siblings.

Residential Mental Health Facilities: Effective Treatment Programs

Depending on the program, school services may be available to ensure that students with depression do not fall behind academically. Facilities such as Solstice East offers a program designed specifically for teens to receive the personal and academic support they need to succeed. Long-term care facilities help with treating disorders like depression and anxiety. Earning a formal education for female teens in a consistently patterned environment may help reduce anxiety and help your child focus. Dedicated residential mental health facilities also maintain the cohesive contact with the family and they ensure proper handling of health privacy boundaries.

Solstice East Residential Programs for Depression and Anxiety

There are many teenage mental health facilities to choose from but ultimately you want what’s best for your teen. At Solstice East, teens gain lifelong skills which they can carry with them through their on-campus high school experience, into college, and then into future careers and families.

Mental health facilitators who work at residential treatment programs are mission driven. Our teams of professionals provide world class care. These well-known services will help your teen to gain confidence throughout their healing journey. The skills gained at Solstice East are proven to help teens create a successful life and to return home to their families. And once learned, these resources, taught by the professionals at Solstice East, can be drawn on by the teen for many years to come and will help them to create and maintain healthy relationships with family, friends, and self.

 

talk therapy

Alternates to Talk Therapy for Anxious Teens

Alternates to Talk Therapy for Anxious Teens 5184 3456 se_admin

In the middle of a panic attack, teens may experience overwhelming physical sensations that make it difficult to breathe, let alone gather their thoughts and talk about their experiences. Sometimes anxious teens don’t want to talk about how they’re feeling because they worry their fears may sound irrational or their thoughts are racing so fast, it can be difficult to pinpoint what is really going on. Talk therapy is not always effective when teens are experiencing intense emotions or struggle with self-awareness. Mindfulness and movement can be valuable alternatives to talk therapy for anxious teens.

Difficulty Understanding Emotions

Many teens have a difficult time managing their emotions as it is hard to understand what they are feeling. Adolescence is a period of significant changes—physically, emotionally, socially, and neurologically. The brain develops at such a rapid pace that areas responsible for emotions are flooded with activity. When these areas are hyperactive, teens with anxiety often go into fight-or-flight mode, which makes it hard to connect with areas that help with reasoning and decision-making that are still developing.

When teens develop a larger emotional vocabulary, they are better able to articulate what they feel, explore possible causes, and accept their emotional experience for what it is. Accepting their feelings gives them more room to change how they feel than labeling these feelings as “bad” or “wrong.”

Listening to Somatic Experiences 

Often, physical sensations of anxiety are so overwhelming that teens find it easier to name butterflies in their stomach than specific fears they may be worried about. Teens with anxiety may feel sick more often, even if there doesn’t seem to be a medical explanation for their ongoing symptoms. 

Many teens believe that emotions and physical sensations are separate, but they tend to inform each other. Acknowledging this connection allows teens to try self-soothing techniques that take care of their physical body in order to manage anxious thoughts, which can be easier than identifying and challenging anxious beliefs.

The Value of Experiential Learning

Teens learn more from experience than they do from lectures. We believe that teens don’t need to talk about their feelings in order to effectively process them if they’re not ready, if they don’t want to, or if it doesn’t feel right.

Some alternates to Talk Therapy include:

  • Journaling, which allows teens to explore their anxious thoughts without sharing them with others
  • Drawing, which encourages teens to express their emotions without using words
  • Practicing grounding meditation or doing a body scan to check in with physical anxiety
  • Practicing yoga helps teens link movement with their breath
  • Neurophysiological tools, like Brainspotting and Neurofeedback
  • Equine Assisted Therapy helps address social anxiety
  • Adventure activities and other physical activities help teens build confidence

Solstice East Can Help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and addictive behaviors. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and integrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us at  828-484-9946 to learn more about experiential therapy.

borderline personality disorder

Reframing Borderline Personality Disorder as Childhood Trauma

Reframing Borderline Personality Disorder as Childhood Trauma 4500 3000 se_admin

We need to start talking about borderline personality disorder for what it really is: a complex response to trauma. While traumatic experiences don’t necessarily trigger signs of a borderline personality, up to 60% of people diagnosed with borderline personality disorder have co-occuring PTSD. It is understood as a combination of genetic factors and early childhood experiences that influence attachment styles, coping mechanisms, and interpersonal relationships. Reframing Borderline Personality Disorder as Childhood Trauma helps psychologists understand underlying causes and frees teens from the label of fundamental problems with their personality.

Defining Characteristics of a Borderline Personality:

  • Unstable self-image
  • Instability in relationships
  • Fear of abandonment
  • Intense emotions
  • Impulsive behaviors

Environmental Factors:

One of the reasons Borderline traits are considered a personality issue is that most people diagnosed with the disorder do not respond to medication, which suggests that it is more environmental than biological in nature. While Borderline traits persist over an extended period of time, they tend to intensify when triggered by stress or traumatic events.

The relationship between traumatic events and Borderline is unclear. While Borderline may be a response to trauma, people with these traits are also more vulnerable to abuse. Between 40 and 86 percent of BPD sufferers report sexual abuse, up to 75 percent say they were emotionally abused, up to 73 percent report physical abuse, and between 17 and 25 percent experienced severe emotional neglect. Following these experiences, they have developed belief systems about their self-worth and an unstable view of relationships based on hurt and manipulation.

Deconstructing Borderline

The similarities between complex PTSD and BPD are numerous. Patients with both conditions have difficulty regulating their emotions; they experience persistent feelings of emptiness, shame, and guilt; and they have a significantly elevated risk of suicide. In some ways, some signs of borderline mimic signs of autism in relation to inconsistent social skills and reactions to an intense world.

When you take away judgments of character associated with a borderline personality, the disorder is characterized by:

  • History of developmental trauma or reactive attachment
  • Rigid processing
  • Sensory sensitivity
  • Slower nonverbal processing

Problems with a Personality Disorder Label

Labeling people with BPD as having a personality disorder can escalate their poor self-esteem. “Personality disorder” translates in many people’s minds as a personality flaw, and this can lead to or intensify an ingrained sense of worthlessness and self-loathing.

This means people with BPD may view themselves more negatively, but can also lead other people – including those closest to them – to do the same. 

Taking a Trauma-Informed Approach

When reframed as childhood trauma, psychologists are better prepared to address underlying issues and come up with concrete solutions. The “personality label” reinforces learned helplessness and treatment-resistance. Using a trauma-informed approach, psychologists look at teens’ individual strengths and needs to find a way to connect with them. The goal of treatment becomes learning how to establish healthy relationships based on personal values and fears.

Solstice East Can Help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, trauma, and addictive behaviors. Many of the girls we work with have been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and have internalized hopelessness in relationships based on this diagnosis. Our relationship-based program focuses on helping young women heal unhealthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives.

Contact us at (855) 672-7058 to learn more about borderline personality disorder. We can help your family today!

teen attachment issues

Teen Attachment Issues: The T.V. and Tips for Parents

Teen Attachment Issues: The T.V. and Tips for Parents 0 0 se_admin

As a parent addressing teen attachment issues can be difficult. You may not know what to do or say to help your teen with their struggles. Research shows that help may be behind the tv screen. Recent studies have found that stories from tv or movies can help individuals cope or manage their own relationship problems. Fictional characters from tv and movies can help individuals better understand their own relationship struggles. Encourage your teen to analyze the relationships of tv characters and how outcomes would have change had they responded differently to the situation.

Steps to Support

Teens attachment issues are not something that will go away overnight. This issue can cause your teen a great deal of stress and emotionally drain them. You may feel like you are constantly trying to help them overcome these issues and nothing is changing. However, you should not give up. With love, care, support, and a lot of patience, you can have a pivotal role in helping your teen manage attachment issues.

Here are some ways you can be supportive towards your teen:

  1. Set realistic expectations. While it seems ideal to fix things overnight, recognize that this is not realistic. Set small goals and celebrate every achievement on the way to the goal. It is all about baby steps.
  2. Keep patient. This point cannot be stressed enough. Sometimes things will not go as planned and that’s okay. By being calm and patient you are creating a better outlook and environment for your teen to heal in.
  3. Take care of you. Before you can help your teen with their own stresses, you must have yours under control. Make sure you are taking appropriate measures to prioritize your own well-being so you can be well-equipped to help your teen.
  4. Seek support. It is always okay to ask for help. This could be the very thing that your teen needs. Lean on family, friends, community resources, and professionals to help you and your family during this time. Don’t wait until you are desperate to ask—this can make things worse. Create a nurturing and supportive environment from the beginning.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with behavior and emotional issues such as those that can stem from peer-relationship struggles. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and integrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us at (855) 672-7058.

solsticeeast

Calming the Identity Crisis: Tips for Parents of Teens with Identity Issues

Calming the Identity Crisis: Tips for Parents of Teens with Identity Issues 750 500 se_admin

The teenage years are full of growing pains. This is a transitional period in our lives where we are determining who we are, who we want to be, where we fit in, and where we don’t. Finding our own identity is easier said than done. It can be an emotional and exhausting journey. It can be difficult to recognize if your child facing obstacles on their quest to identify. Here are some ways that your child can indicate struggles in this area:

Obsessing with status symbols. Adolescents try to establish themselves through prestige — wearing what’s in style, having the latest devices, and whatever other criteria is required to be in the “in crowd”. These symbols help form teen identities by expressing affiliation with specific groups. Teens can become obsessed with this idea and tirelessly commit to fulfilling the role. While they may not actually enjoy the clothes or company, it is a way for them to feel accepted.

Acting out to fit in. Teens often feel obligated to assert their independence, because that comes with growing up and being “cool”. They may feel that appearing mature will bring attention and acceptance. They begin engaging in practices they associate with adulthood — tabooed pleasures — such as smoking, drinking, drugs and sexual activity.

Rebelling and being risky. Rebellion indicates separation. Teens can show that they differentiate themselves from parents and authority figures while maintaining the acceptance of their peers. They can loudly demonstrate this by rebelling from authority figures or engaging in risky behaviors.

Forming cliques. Teens often can be ruthless in their exclusion of their peers. Since they are constantly trying to define and redefine themselves in relation to others, they do not want to be associated with anyone having unacceptable or unattractive characteristics. They work to strengthen their own identities by excluding those who are not like themselves.

Helping your teen on their hunt

As the teenage years bring about many hardships, being supportive of your teen is crucial. While you cannot tell them who they are, and you shouldn’t, you can help guide and support them in the self-discovery process. Here are some guiding steps you can put in action with your teen:

Pull out the paper.

Have your teen create a list of personal characteristics that are most important to them, the aspects least important, and the aspects of intermediate importance. Use this list to talk about values and the threat that peer pressure poses to unpopular beliefs. Also don’t be afraid to revisit this list when your teen seems to veer from the path they set for themselves in a negative way.

Create a collage.

One entitled “Who I am,” and the other, “Who l would like to be.” After the collages are completed, discuss why the specific images were chosen in each collage. This is a great opportunity to set goals and plans to achieve the person that your teen wants to be.

Answer the “Who am I?”

Have your teen write down 20 responses to this question as quickly as possible, without self-censoring. Discuss the answers as well as the process of choosing each answer. Does your teen like their answers, if not what can they do to improve themselves? This is an effective and healthy way to process.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with behavior and emotional issues along with mental disorders. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and reintegrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!
Contact us @ 828-484-9946

teen mindfulness program

Breathe In, Breathe Out: How Mindfulness Helps Teens who Struggle with Depression and Anxiety

Breathe In, Breathe Out: How Mindfulness Helps Teens who Struggle with Depression and Anxiety 640 426 se_admin

Teen suicide. Substance abuse. Bullying and fights. Although seemingly unrelated, these all too frequent epidemics are plaguing today’s schools; and, frequently, they seem to spring from a single common source.

Kids are finding it tough to cope these days; the challenging, sometimes stifling demands of peer pressure and academic performance placing undue stress on their sensitive psyche.

In order to combat these issues—and, for that matter, the feelings of anger, frustration, and sometimes out and out hopelessness that accompany them—many school districts are offering mindfulness sessions in school.

Mindfulness involves the teaching of techniques like breathing and meditation to help people calm themselves and control their emotions.

Here is how you and your teen’s teacher can put mindfulness to work for them:

  1. Guide the teen in the commission of deliberate deep breathing exercises. The phrase “Stop and take a good deep breath,” never has been more applicable. The simple act of stopping, falling silent, and taking a good, deep breath can do much to center and calm a frenetic teen; especially if they happen to be in the throes of an anxiety attack, when the simple process of breathing becomes strained and difficult.
  2. Learn more about yoga and meditation. These sacred, time-honored arts have been utilized for centuries to bring peace, balance and happiness to people of all ages. Through instructional classes, books and videos, you can learn the principles and practices of yoga and meditation; passing this information on to your troubled teen. Teachers can lead meditative sessions in the classroom, and physical education teachers might integrate yoga into daily fitness regimens. Parents can morph a good yoga or meditation session into an enjoyable family activity.
  3. Encourage self-reflection. Train your teen to reflect on and contemplate their problems and stressors; also to discuss these issues with parents and teachers, so that you can work together to find healthy and workable solutions.
  4. Teach and encourage your teen to express themselves. When teens are empowered to release their tensions and frustrations in constructive and highly creative manners, then they no doubt will feel calmer, more centered, and more in control of their emotions. If they can sing a song instead of scream, draw a picture instead of take a drug, write instead of cut, etc., then they will develop a positive and intensely constructive outlet for their emotions.

Form a mindfulness team with your teen. When you meditate, breathe or draw/write/sing with the troubled teen, then you will bring the divine circle of mindfulness to its completion—to the benefit of both of you

teen mood disorders

Sleep Deprived Youth at a Higher Risk for Teen Mood Disorders

Sleep Deprived Youth at a Higher Risk for Teen Mood Disorders 1920 1275 se_admin

Recently, it’s become more clear how much damage not getting enough sleep can cause. Higher risks of depression, anxiety, heart disease, and more have been linked to sleep deprivation. This common teenage issue can wreak havoc on a child’s academic performance, physical health, mental health, and more. While we’re still understanding what causes it, yet another study has shown a strong link between shuteye and teen mood disorders.

Sleep deprived teens common

This is simply a fact–and it’s not hard to believe, either (if you’re the parent of a teen). According to the National Sleep Foundation, about 15 percent of teenagers report getting the minimum amount of sleep. Teens need to get around 8 to 10 hours of sleep a night. This means that more than 4 in 5 teens are walking around, going to school, and driving cars sleep deprived.

It’s not unusual for teens to stay up late and wake up early for school–especially when devices are allowed in bedrooms at night. It’s becoming clear that there are serious consequences of this behavior, though. A lot more than just being moody and falling asleep in class.

Study shows lack of sleep can lead to teen mood disorders

A new study by the University of Pittsburgh looked into the connection between mental health and sleep deprivation. Researchers found that even lack of sleep for a short period of time can increase their risk for teen mood disorders in the long term.

Results revealed that the part of the brain involved in goal-based actions and learning from rewards, the putamen, was less responsive in sleep deprived participants. In other words, they received less reaction from getting rewards. Symptoms of depression were also higher with sleep deprivation.

This study just confirms findings from many, many other studies showing the same results; a strong link between less activity in the brain’s reward system and mood disorders exists.

Overall, it’s clear that sleep is essential to mental health. If you believe your daughter may be struggling with a mental health issue, don’t wait. It’s critical to reach out to a professional for early treatment.

Solstice East is here to help your daughter

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why we centered our program on them. At Solstice, we offer our students help for anxiety, depression, teen mood disorders, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about how we help with teen mood disorders at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Avoiding Anxiety in Teens

Avoiding Anxiety in Teens 150 150 se_admin

With anxiety being one of the most common mental health issues found in the general population, avoiding anxiety in teens can be challenging. While medication, therapy, and the support of loved ones can help, anxiety in teens is often something that will follow them throughout life. As a result, worry and irrational fear are a constant part of their lives. A recent article by Bustle discusses 3 situations that should be avoided when dealing with anxiety in teens.

It’s extremely important that individuals suffering from anxiety in teens not avoid every situation that gives them anxiety—doing so can actually make anxiety in teens worse, and cause them to miss out on important opportunities. However, it’s important that teens not push themselves to a breaking point.

Anxiety in Teens: 3 Situations That Should Be Avoided

  1. Toxic Environments. Teens spend 40 hours a week at school, so it’s incredibly difficult when the environment is toxic. Bullying or social issues among peers can especially cause anxiety in teens. Many teens who suffer from this report having symptoms including sleep problems, trouble concentrating, and anxiety. If teens are experiencing a toxic environment, they should discuss with their teachers or advisors about switching seats in class or avoiding people that are causing them distress.
  2. Triggering Living Situations. When anxiety in teens is present, teens often have to face fears on a daily basis. Triggers like public speaking, driving, or meeting new people are things that individuals with anxiety need to push themselves to do, otherwise they let the disorder win. Living with anxiety in teens is often incredibly exhausting, because normal activities that are east for most teens require significantly more effort from those with anxiety. Ensuring that the home environment is a safe space is essential. Of course, no living situation is perfect, but eliminating potential anxiety triggers in the home can help reduce anxiety on a daily basis.
  3. Spending Too Much Time Alone. While there’s a lot of value in alone time, it’s important to be maintain social relationships. Anxiety in teens can cause individuals to feel the need to hide from the world. This is often due to an excess in negative thoughts. When people with anxiety are left alone with these negative thoughts, it ca be harder for them to control them and maintain a healthy life. When symptoms of anxiety are high, teens should consider spending more time with loved ones or peers, instead of hiding out.

If your teen is struggling with anxiety, there are programs that can help.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

Treatment for Anxiety: 4 Tips for Curbing Anxiety and Stress

Treatment for Anxiety: 4 Tips for Curbing Anxiety and Stress se_admin

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illnesses in the United States. Research shows that over 25 percent of teens, ages 13 to 18, will experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their lives. Despite this incredibly high chance of dealing with anxiety, very few actually end up receiving treatment for anxiety.

Studies have actually confirmed that up to 80 percent of children with diagnosable anxiety disorders never get treated for it. That’s an appalling number and it should scare parents to their very core. Dealing with anxiety is a normal part of life, but an anxiety disorder can cause an adolescent to experience high amounts of nervousness, fear, and even begin to avoid certain place and activities.

Ways to help combat anxiety and stress

When anxiety is ignored and no treatment is sought out, it has the capacity to disrupt daily life at school, at home, at work–nowhere is untouchable. It’s important to teach our children ways to cope with and manage anxiety when it becomes too much to handle.

 

  1. In moments of stress, breathe deeply. Those who suffer from anxiety often struggle to keep calm during stressful situations. Hands get clammy, knees get weak, and it’s suddenly hard to breathe. When you feel yourself starting to panic, it’s important to breathe deeply. Inhale through your nose while holding one nostril, keep that breath in for around 8 seconds, and slowly exhale through your mouth. Repeat for about a minute.
  2. Remember to be in the moment. Mindfulness practice has become increasingly popular, but it’s more than just a trend. Research has shown that mindfulness has the ability to decrease anxiety and depression, making it a powerful tool in treatment for anxiety in daily life.
  3. Don’t isolate, reach out to others. This can seem extremely hard for many, especially with the infamous stigma attached to mental health issues–but it’s critical to handling stress. Without the support of others in these times of struggle, it’s difficult to move forward or find any sense of resolution. While curving in on yourself may seem like an easy way to deal, bottling up these issues will just cause them to grow.
  4. Spend some time in nature. I’m not saying go on a 3-week hike through the Appalachian mountains (unless you’re into that)–studies show that spending around 10-minutes a day around nature (hiking, taking a stroll through a park, etc.) can lower anxiety and depression a significant amount.

Anxiety is a serious issue that requires serious help. If you believe your daughter may need treatment for anxiety or other mental health issues, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for further guidance.

Solstice East offers treatment for anxiety in teen girls

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our students often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about treatment for anxiety at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Evidence Shows Yoga Could Aid in the Treatment for Stress & Anxiety

Evidence Shows Yoga Could Aid in the Treatment for Stress & Anxiety se_admin

When you think about treatment for stress and anxiety, it usually includes various clinical practices and medications, but there are simple tactics that have shown great promise, as well–such as yoga.

This is typically when you start shaking your head and thinking, “Yoga can’t possibly be an effective treatment for stress.” While yoga may not be able to cure anxiety by itself, when paired with other therapies it can add to the overall effectiveness of the process in treatment for stress and anxiety disorders.

Studies show yoga combats stress  

Yoga, meditation, and other practices have been increasing in popularity as exercise for some time now–but now they may be offering more than just physical benefits. Recent studies have found that mind-body interventions (MBIs)–like yoga–are able to combat changes that lead to stress.

The study was published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. It focused on trying to figure out how the underlying mechanisms that make yoga so relaxing work–because if we understand those, it may be easier to replicate and allow us to provide better treatment for stress and anxiety.

The researchers found that individuals who frequently use MBIs produce less of a molecule linked to regulating gene expression. When you go through something stressful, the nervous system responds, creating the “fight-or-flight” reaction, which spurs on the production of this molecule which then leads to cellular inflammation–which is connected to issues like depression and anxiety.

The study’s leader, Ivana Buric, explained why this matters:

“Millions of people around the world already enjoy the health benefits of mind-body interventions like yoga or meditation, but what they perhaps don’t realize is that these benefits begin at a molecular level and can change the way our genetic code goes about its business.”

AKA, it can improve your body’s responses to stress and how it processes it. Those who need treatment for stress and anxiety struggle with exactly that issue. They battle to stay in control of their emotions during moments when their stress is high–and their emotions often end up controlling them instead, leading to things like panic attacks.

Yoga isn’t a cure-all. It’s a practice that can be used to keep issues in check alongside other forms of treatment for stress. If you believe your daughter is struggling, it’s critical to seek out a professional for further guidance.

Solstice East is here for your family

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our students often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about treatment for stress at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.