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Depression

Depression Around the World: The History of Depression in Japan

Depression Around the World: The History of Depression in Japan 150 150 se_admin

Mental illness is extremely common around the world, but many countries haven’t recognized certain illnesses like depression until recently. Depression in Japan was not widely recognized until the late 1990s. It wasn’t until an advertising campaign for anti-depressants was released that called depression “cold of the soul” that the recognition of depression finally boomed. A recent article by BBC News discusses the views of depression around the world, and Japan’s process of accepting depression as a mental illness.

Understanding how the World Views Depression and Mental Illness

Up until the late 1990s, depression in Japan was something rarely heard of outside psychiatric circles. Some claimed this was due to people in Japan simply not suffering from depression. They believe people found ways to accommodate depressive feelings while somehow being able to carry on with daily life.

A more likely reason is Japan’s medical tradition, in which depression has been regarded as primarily physical rather than a combination of physical and psychological. Depression in Japan was hardly diagnosed, and treatments for symptoms of depression in Japan were often to use rest or exercise.

When the boom of anti-depressants hit the rest of the world, Japan wasn’t on the same page. It wasn’t until a marketing campaign commissioned by a Japanese drugs firm helped turn things around. Word was spread about depression in Japan, defining it as a cold of the soul. They stated it could happen to anyone, and medication was the way to treat it.

The number of people diagnosed with a mood disorder in Japan doubled in just four years. The new illness was not just acceptable now—it was even slightly fashionable. After a few years of a general understanding of depression in Japan had taken place, an outcry for change occurred from many individuals who felt depressed from being overworked by their employers.

Many families fought in court to show that depression could be caused by a person’s circumstances, including overwork—stating it was not purely about genetic inheritance. They also argued that Japans idea that suicide was straightforwardly intentional, were inadequate. At this time, mental illness had gone from a hush-hush family matter to the focus of a worker’s movement.

Since then, Japan has brought in workplace stress checks, a questionnaire covering causes and symptoms of stress which is later assessed by doctors and nurses, and medical care for those who need it. These measures are mandatory for any company with more than 50 staff, and smaller businesses are encouraged to do the same.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

Childhood Obesity and the Urge for Change 

Childhood Obesity and the Urge for Change  150 150 se_admin

As a parent, getting your child to eat healthy and be active can be difficult. Some youth find the act of being healthy a chore, and often fight parents on doing it. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, obesity most often develops from ages 5 to 6 or during the teen years, and studies have shown that a child who is obese between the ages of 10 and 13 has an 80 percent chance of becoming an obese adult. A recent article by the New York Times discusses the significant health risks childhood obesity has on youth.

Effects of Childhood Obesity

Life-threatening conditions like heart disease, cancer, stroke and Type 2 diabetes are more commonly heard of effecting adults, but they can also be consequences of childhood obesity. Two new studies, conducted on over half a million children, linked a childhood obesity to an increased risk of developing colon cancer and suffering from an early stroke as adults.

When is Your Child Considered Obese

Children are generally considered obese when their B.M.I. is at or above the 95th percentile for others of the same age and sex. Currently, one-third of American children are overweight or suffering with childhood obesity. In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 18 percent of children and 21 percent of adolescents were dealing with childhood obesity.

Studies on Childhood Obesity

Many people assume that children dealing with childhood obesity won’t see the effects of major health risks until later in life, if they still struggle with obesity. But studies have shown that childhood obesity starts to effect youth early on. Dr. Stephen R. Daniels, a pediatrician at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Children’s Hospital in Denver, found that problems in many organ systems were often apparent long before adulthood. They include high blood pressure; insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes; heart-damage and high levels of cholesterol; liver disease; obstructive sleep apnea; asthma; and excess stress on the musculoskeletal system resulting in abnormal bone development, knee and hip pain, and difficulty walking.

Youth suffering from childhood obesity are also at a greater risk for developing mental health issues. Obese adolescents have higher rates of depression, which in itself can foster poor eating and exercise patterns that add to their weight issues. They’re also more likely to have poor body image and self-esteem.

Urge for Change

This information reveals the critical importance on promoting healthy eating habits and exercise patterns in all youth. Parents should encourage children to be active and make healthy decisions, without labeling them as overweight or obese. Commenting on kid’s weight can actually harm their self-esteem, increasing their unhealthy habits. It is important that parents encourage kids by changing their environment and creating opportunities for them to be active.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East handles social media addiction, please call 828-484-9946!

Using Magnets for Depression Treatment and More

Using Magnets for Depression Treatment and More 150 150 se_admin

In a recent article by NPR, a relatively new FDA approved (it’s been around since 1985, but not approved until 2008) form of depression treatment was discussed: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). It sounds incredibly complicated and a little scary, but it’s really not. A simplified version from the National Institute of Mental Health is that it’s short electromagnetic pulses sent through a coil that’s put against the forehead near an area of the brain thought to relate to mood regulation.

Only used in worst case scenarios

Currently, TMS is a last resort option as depression treatment. Effective major depression treatment is sparse, which is why TMS is often used to treat it. Studies have shown TMS to also be a more tolerable, efficient, and safe major depression treatment than the other options available.

TMS is actually being considered as more than just depression treatment, but possibly other mental disorders. The most recent use for TMS has been in treating symptoms of autism spectrum disorder–but many more studies must be done to tell whether it will be effective or not. Though more research is needed to confirm its usefulness, TMS is obviously helpful in treating aspects of major depression.

Other forms of depression treatment

Many types of therapy and medications are used as depression treatment. A frequently used form of psychotherapy for depression is cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). It’s used to take negative, fruitless thoughts and replace them with more useful, realistic ones. A frequently type of medication for depression treatment are antidepressants. No one medication or type of therapy works the same on someone suffering from depression. It often takes time to figure out the right combination for each individual.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. We strive to help our girls develop healthy habits for teens and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about depression treatment for your daughter at Solstice East, please call 828-484-9946.

Frozen Actress Kristen Bell Discusses Battle With Depression

Frozen Actress Kristen Bell Discusses Battle With Depression 150 150 se_admin

Recently, Kristen Bell, star of Frozen and Veronica Mars, opened up about her battle with depression. She penned an essay describing the dark and “all consuming” times in her life where depression took hold of her. As a normally bubbly, positive person, her depression made her feel like she was a different person altogether. This is the way many people feel while experiencing signs of depression.

In the same essay, Kristen Bell also discusses the importance of going to regular checkups with a mental health professional, the same way you would with any other doctor. 

If you have a child you suspect is struggling with depression, it’s important to recognize the signs of depression and get them the help they need.

Noticing the Signs of Depression

If your teen has started shutting off from the world, it might be a sign that they are depressed. Depression can look like a variety of different things. Here are a few symptoms of depression to look out for in your teen:

  • No energy: If your teen is constantly holed up in their room sleeping or stays up at all hours of the night, it may be a sign of something like depression.
  • Acting recklessly: Impulsive, reckless behavior like substance use and dangerous driving
  • Problems concentrating: Trouble paying attention in class, staying engaged in conversations for an extended period of time
  • Not interested in former hobbies: Completely detached from activities they were once passionate about
  • Isolation from friends: Your teen may have stopped hanging out with their friend group for seemingly no reason at all

How to Help

After your child is diagnosed with depression, many parents have no idea what the next step would be. If your child has started displaying worrisome behaviors due to their depression, it might be a good idea to seek professional help. Other things you can do at home include:

  • Getting your child moving and active: Exercise has been shown to decrease the symptoms of depression in depressed individuals. If your child is usually a couch potato, get them to go on a walk with you every day after dinner or something. That will help them feel better and it’s a great bonding opportunity as well.
  • Healthy diet: Make sure your teen is staying away from junk food if they are struggling with depression. Eating foods rich in mood enhancing nutrients such as bananas, spinach, and quinoa can help improve her overall well being.
  • Reach out to family and friends for help: It’s important for your teen to know that they are not alone in their struggles with depression. Having a strong support group is super important to their overall mental health.

Solstice East can help

If you have a daughter struggling with depression, it might be a good idea to seek professional help. Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your daughter work through her emotional and behavioral struggles.

 

For more information about Solstice East, please call  (855) 672-7058 today!

 

New Study Helps Shed Light on Adult and Teen Depression

New Study Helps Shed Light on Adult and Teen Depression 150 150 se_admin

Adult and teen depression affects many lives and any research clarifying how it works is helpful in treatment. ScienceDaily recently reported on a new University College London (UCL) study concerning a part of the brain labeled the habenula. This tiny part of the brain reacts to unpleasant experiences, making it of interest for understanding adult and teen depression.

What the study found

The results were surprising to the researchers conducting the study. It’s been long thought that the habenula is hyperactive within people with depression, which also helps in driving the symptoms of adult and teen depression. But when they tested this theory, they got the opposite result. Instead, the habenula reacted less in people struggling with depression.

Between the individuals who had never been depressed and those that had, there was no difference in habenula size. Although, they did find that overall–never-depressed and depressed–that those with a smaller habenula had more anhedonia symptoms (a loss of pleasure or interest in life).    

Now researchers understand the habenula’s role in adult and teen depression a little more clearly. They think the habenula may aid us in moving past or avoiding unpleasant memories or thoughts–but when messed with, we may be more prone to focus on negative experiences.

What this means for teen depression

More than 1 in 10 teens, ages 12 to 17, have experienced extreme teen depression at some point. Many effective treatments exist today, but those treatments don’t always work for everyone; this makes it still extremely important to seek out new information concerning teen depression. This study doesn’t solve teen depression, but it helps researchers further understand what causes and drives it to persist.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with teen depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral issues. We strive to help our girls lead themselves back onto a path of health and happiness.

For more information about Solstice East, please call 828-484-9946.