• Residential Treatment Center for Teens 14-17

Depression

bipolar disorder and depression

Differences Between Bipolar Disorder and Depression

Differences Between Bipolar Disorder and Depression 2560 1709 se_admin

Bipolar disorder is one of the most commonly misdiagnosed disorders in teens, which is why many professionals caution early diagnosis and medication, unlike most other mental health struggles. Knowing the difference between bipolar disorder, depression, and teen mood swings is important in determining what treatment options will be effective for your child. 

What is Depression in Teens?

Depression is one of the most commonly reported mental health struggle among teens. Depression is more than just periods of sadness or a discouraged response to stressful events. While everyone experiences sadness to some degree, Major Depressive Disorder refers to periods of intense sadness and hopelessness about the future that lasts at least two weeks. 

Depression is also characterized by:

  • Loss of interest in activities they used to enjoy
  • Feeling misunderstood and extremely sensitive
  • Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
  • Irritability or impulsivity
  • Eating or sleeping too much or too little
  • Social withdrawal
  • Low self-esteem and feelings of worthlessness

What is Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar Disorder, formerly known as manic-depressive disorder, involves cycling between high highs and low lows–often unpredictably. Many people with bipolar are diagnosed after experiencing a depressive episode. In contrast, manic symptoms are marked by high energy and impulsivity which are more likely to be identified as behavior problems. 

Often, people with bipolar disorder are first diagnosed with depression if they consult a professional during a depressive episode. But, sometimes, the line between mania and depression isn’t as clear cut as one would think. Teens who are in the middle of the depressive part of the bipolar cycle may also display features of mania, like racing thoughts or risk-taking, that can lead to overlooking signs of depression.

Mania is characterized by: 

  • Extremely high energy
  • Racing thoughts and/or rambling speech
  • Grandiose ideas  
  • Inflated sense of self-esteem
  • Reduced need for sleep without fatigue
  • Restlessness and being easily distracted
  • Increased pursuit of risky and impulsive behaviors, such as sexuality, spending, substance use

Are All Mood Swings Bipolar Disorder?

A common misperception is that people with depression are expected to be consistently depressed for a long period of time and that anyone whose level of depression fluctuates must be bipolar. Typically, depression occurs in episodes as well, with the most intense symptoms present for between 2 weeks to a few months. In between episodes, it may be hard to notice warning signs that they might experience another depressive episode.

Unlike people with major depressive disorder, teens with bipolar disorder struggle to maintain to a stable “baseline” between the mood swings they experience. While many people assume that mania is more “enjoyable” than feelings of depression, mania is not just periods of happiness or stability between periods of deep sadness and low energy.

That being said, not all mood swings are a sign of mental health struggles. Adolescents are known for experiencing a roller coaster of emotions, largely due to hormonal changes and their lack of skills to regulate their emotions. As teens have often been protected from having to directly cope with stressful life events during childhood, they may become more easily overwhelmed by normal teen issues. 

Why is the difference between depression and bipolar disorder in teens important?

Looking at the overlap in symptoms between depression, bipolar disorder, and mood swings rather than focusing on the label of a diagnosis helps clinicians come up with a well-rounded treatment plan to address the bigger picture of your child’s wellbeing. 

By specializing in working with this age group, Solstice East uses developmentally-appropriate therapeutic techniques, acknowledging that the rational side of teen’s brains is developing rapidly. This can lead to mood swings, difficulty describing how exactly they are feeling, and trouble self-regulating–all of which could lead to a clinical diagnosis. Teens are at a critical stage in their lives, where adopting healthier coping mechanisms can help break the pattern of getting overwhelmed by emotions and swinging from one extreme to the next. 

While our residential program emphasizes the power of recreation activities and positive relationships in mood regulation, our qualified psychiatrist monitors medication for teens who have been diagnosed with a mood disorder, like depression or bipolar disorder. We believe it is important to clarify diagnoses in order to know the best way to empower your child to anticipate mood changes and manage their emotions in a healthier way.

Solstice East Can Help 

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with behavior and emotional issues such as those that can stem from peer-relationship struggles. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and integrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us at (855) 672-7058

boredom among teens

Boredom Among Teens Affects Rates of Depression

Boredom Among Teens Affects Rates of Depression 1706 2560 se_admin

Although new technologies are released every year, an analysis of the popular Monitoring the Future survey found that boredom among teens is rising year after year for high schoolers. In every grade, girls’ boredom levels steeper rises than boys, rising an average of 2 percent every year. Everybody experiences boredom from time to time, but many people don’t realize it may be associated with depressive symptoms and risky behaviors, such as substance use, particularly among teens.

Why Are Teens So Bored?

With the rise of social media, teens are filling more of their leisure time with technology than structured social activities. While they are constantly refreshing their feed for new posts, the process of infinite scrolling can become boring. Girls are particularly vulnerable to comparing themselves to others online and feeling that they don’t measure up. As more teens are turning to socialize online, they are more likely to feel disconnected in their offline lives. 

Possible reasons for increases in boredom may include:

  • Dissatisfaction with how their time is spent
  • Increased digital media use
  • Less physical activity
  • Spending more time alone
  • Rising levels of depression

Trouble Coping with Boredom

“Adolescence is a time of change and growth,” said Elizabeth Weybright, researcher of adolescent development at Washington State University. “Teens want more independence, but may not have as much autonomy as they’d like in their school and home life. That creates situations where they’re prone to boredom, and may have a hard time coping with being bored.”

Boredom is a much more difficult experience for adolescents who typically have less life experience, coping skills, and healthy relationships than adults do to take advantage of their free time. Boredom tends to increase during early adolescence when teens are disconnected from both their childhood interests and adult responsibilities. 

Teens who get bored easily during their free time often lose interest in activities, have difficulty focusing on one task at a time, feel directionless, and unmotivated. Especially on weekends and vacations from school, teens struggle with finding structured activities and environments to keep them organized and distract them from feelings of depression and loneliness.

Recreation Activities for Depressed Teens

According to a study conducted by the University of Bologna, teens who are more prone to boredom have fewer hobbies, are less likely to engage in activities like sports, use technology more, and binge drink more often. 

It may seem obvious that finding healthy social activities that they enjoy is essential for helping depressed teens fight boredom. However, teens with depression often struggle with a lack of interest in activities they used to enjoy, social anxiety around group activities, and a lack of motivation to try new things. Residential treatment centers offer a variety of recreation activities in a structured therapeutic environment to encourage teen girls to reflect on the challenges they face and find healthier ways to cope with feelings of boredom and depression.

Solstice East is experientially focused and integrates daily workouts, weekly adventure activities, and off campus-service opportunities that help students develop meaningful relationships and personal goals. Adventure therapy serves as a powerful addition to talk therapy for depressed teens.

Solstice East Can Help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and addictive behaviors. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and integrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us at  828-484-9946 to learn more about experiential therapy.

bullying and substance use

Bullying May Lead to Substance Use In Teen Girls

Bullying May Lead to Substance Use In Teen Girls 2373 3560 se_admin

Bullying is a serious problem among teen girls. Not only in how it affects their view of relationships, but as a risk factor for loneliness, depression, suicide, and unhealthy coping mechanisms. Bullying can completely warp one’s sense of self and safety, which can lead to long-lasting emotional consequences, long after incidents of bullying stop. Girls who have been victims of bullying are more likely to turn to substance use to cope with negative emotions.

  • Bullying is most prevalent in middle school, while substance use is more common among high school students
  • Students who are involved in bullying are more likely than those not involved to try alcohol or other drugs
  • Adverse childhood experiences are associated with developing unhealthy coping mechanisms later on in life

Depression is the Missing Link

A study conducted by the University of Washington suggests that bullying-related depression among adolescent girls may lead to increased substance use. A key finding of this study was gender differences in the role substance use plays in coping with depression and victimization. Bullying was linked to substance use in both males and females, but depression was only associated with victimization, not substance use in boys. 

This suggests that bullying takes a more significant toll in girls’ emotional wellbeing and can lead to destructive coping mechanisms. This is significant as girls are usually expected to internalize emotional issues while it is assumed boys are more likely to act out.

Another reason contributing to gender differences is that girls place more value on social relationships, therefore the effects of bullying tend to be more devastating. Girls are also more vulnerable to cyberbullying due to higher levels of social media use, which means that bullying may not stop when the school day ends. 

Reasons Why Teens Turn to Substance Use

 

  • While boys often turn to substance use as a social activity, girls are more likely to turn to substance use to cope with emotional issues. 
  • Boys may be more likely to experience negative consequences due to risky behaviors associated with substance use, but girls are more likely to develop an emotional attachment to substances that contributes to addictive patterns. 
  • They learn quickly that they can change the way they feel by using substances through numbing emotional pain, increasing feelings of pleasure, or reducing feelings of anxiety. 
  • Sensation-seeking teens seek out new experiences to fight boredom and chase thrills.

 

 

How Bullying Plays a Role in Substance Use

Teens who have been a victim of bullying often feel socially isolated and desperate for connection. Bullying and rejection sends them messages that they are worthless and unlovable and these narratives can be hard to challenge. This can interfere with their motivation to connect with others, their ability to feel comfortable being themselves, and their desire to escape from potentially uncomfortable social situations. 

Over time, substance use can have a similar effect, but before problems compound, teens learn that substances can meet this need for connection in a variety of ways. 

  • Many substances increase levels of the “love hormone,” oxytocin, which reduces social anxiety and increases empathy for others. 
  • Drinking and smoking is usually a social activity for teenagers, which helps isolated teens feel more included.
  • As substance use is often a matter of accessibility, teens develop relationships with other substance-using peers in order to find drugs and alcohol, even if those relationships lack emotional intimacy.
  • While “peer pressure” is considered a myth regarding substance use, it is true that many teens think using substances will make them look cool or help them fit in. In some cases, they believe it will help them stand out less.
  • Due to behavioral inhibition and numbing negative emotions, teens experience less social anxiety that have dominated their past social experiences.

A Holistic Approach to Finding Authentic Connection

Just as none of these issues exist in isolation, addressing these complex issues requires a multidimensional approach. Residential programs provide a supportive healing environment for girls struggling with relationship issues and destructive behaviors to build authentic connections with others. Removed from negative influences in their home environment, girls have the opportunity to focus on themselves and explore their strengths.

Solstice East Can Help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with depression, anxiety, and addictive behaviors, like substance use, that often emerge as a way to cope with the effects of bullying and trauma. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives.

Contact us at (855) 672-7058. We can help your family today!

 

teenage daughter is depressed

What to Do When Your Teenage Daughter is Depressed and Refusing Help

What to Do When Your Teenage Daughter is Depressed and Refusing Help 3957 5936 se_admin

The teenage years can bring about new defiance in your teen. If your teenage daughter is depressed and refusing help, this can make things challenging for you as a parent. You want them to feel better, but without help, that is nearly impossible. First you should understand that asking for help or seeking help for that matter is not always easy. Your teen may refuse help for the following reasons:

  • They feel ashamed of their depression 
  • They do not want to talk about the things that hurt them
  • The idea of confiding in a stranger scares them 
  • Teens may feel like no one will understand

One of these reasons could be why your daughter does not want to seek professional help. If you try to force her to go, you are only risking creating resentment from her towards you. She may feel like you are not on your side and you are being completely inconsiderate of her own boundaries. However, we know this is not the case. You want your daughter to be happy and healthy. And getting help is the solution to getting her on her way. 

Starter Tips: If Your Teenage Daughter Is Depressed

VeryWellMind has compiled a list of suggestions for parents on how to confront a teen who refuses to get help. Consider implementing these steps at home. What works for one teen may not work for another. However, this is a good starting point. Here are some tips on how you can effectively encourage your daughter to seek help:

  • Talk to her about the symptoms you’re seeing that lead you to believe she has depression.
  • Discuss how having untreated depression can negatively impact her.
  • Make a compassionate deal. For example, tell her that if she’ll agree to an evaluation with a therapist specializing in teen depression, you’ll treat her to a hot fudge sundae or another reward that motivates her.
  • Attempt to empathize with the pain she is feeling. For example, discuss that while you can’t know how she’s feeling, outwardly she seems unhappy.
  • Reassure her that being depressed is a common medical condition that she can’t control and should never feel ashamed about.
  • Write down and give her a list of the positive qualities you know she has that will help her to heal.
  • Openly acknowledge that getting help takes courage.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with behavior and emotional issues such as those that can stem from peer-relationship struggles. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and integrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us @ 828-484-9946

 

sadness in teens

Why Teens Avoid the D Word: Sadness in Teens

Why Teens Avoid the D Word: Sadness in Teens 3888 2592 se_admin

Teens with depression may feel uncomfortable verbalizing how they feel. They may feel embarrassed or may not want to seem vulnerable. Some things to consider include why it may be hard for your teen to say they are depressed instead of grumpy or sad. Sadness in teens is perceived differently by every individual. The consequences of saying “I’m depressed” may be too overwhelming for a teen which is why the resort to “I’m grumpy”. As a parent it is important that you listen to understand and learn about some reasons why your teen may choose a different word. You are there biggest advocate and it is critical that they feel loved and supported by you. Talk to your teen. Find out what they are uncomfortable with. Ask them how you can help.

Some reasons why your teen may avoid saying that they are depressed include the following.

Fear of the Follow-up Response

Often times, people naturally respond “why?” when someone says they are depressed. This can make teens feel cornered. And like the way they feel is wrong. The reality is that no one chooses to be/feel depressed therefore they should not feel like they have to explain themselves. Often times, people group those struggling with depression with everyone else. There typically is an explanation for emotions. However, those dealing with depression may not have an answer. And that’s okay.

The Social Aspect

It’s normal to do whatever we deem as socially acceptable. Quite frankly saying “I’m grumpy” feels a lot more socially acceptable than “I’m depressed”. When one says their grumpy, people tend to find that relatable. Like we’ve all been grumpy before. However, when one admits to being depressed everything can get awkward. Did you ever consider this may be why your teen doesn’t want to throw that word around? Because it makes them feel like an outcast.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with behavior and emotional issues such as those that can stem from peer-relationship struggles. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and integrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us at (855) 672-7058

depressed struggling teen

Steps to Help A Depressed Struggling Teen

Steps to Help A Depressed Struggling Teen 5594 4000 se_admin

Finding the best help for a depressed struggling teen is not always a straight shot. What works for one teen may not be helpful for another. As kids become older and their life problems become more complex, you have to transition to a supportive role. You may not have all the answers, but that’s okay. Your job is not always to be your teens hero and sometimes they need help that you cannot provide them with. A depressed struggling teen may take a little more effort and attention, but there is hope. Below are three steps to help you begin addressing your teen’s struggles.

Step One

The first step to helping your teen is to listen without judgement. One of the most important things you can do for your teen is to work on strengthening your relationship. Try to build empathy and understanding by putting yourself in his shoes. You might be frustrated that he seems down and irritable a lot of the time and doesn’t seem to be doing much of anything to help himself. But if there isn’t much in his life that is making him happy, or something intensely disappointing has happened to him, it’s understandable that he might avoid things he used to enjoy and retreat to his room. Depression makes even doing the smallest things more difficult.

Step Two

Make sure you’re pointing out the positive things your teen is doing. Going to school, holding down a part-time job, doing the dishes or picking up a sibling from school: These are all good and productive things they are doing, and it’s important to recognize them rather than thinking, “This is what she should be doing.” We all like to be appreciated and recognized for doing a good job even when it’s expected of us. This will help boost your teen’s confidence and positive outlook.

Step Three

Getting help is a critical part of your teen’s recover. Some teens will want to go to therapy when you ask them and some won’t. For those who are resistant, know that they aren’t going to suddenly open up to the idea of therapy (or to you) quickly, but you can help guide them towards treatment by opening the door and then waiting patiently for them to walk through it. Contact your local health care provider and seek guidance on next steps.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with behavior and emotional issues such as those that can stem from peer-relationship struggles. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and integrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us @ 828-484-9946

adolescent depression treatment

Adolescent Depression Treatment: All About Cognitive Biases

Adolescent Depression Treatment: All About Cognitive Biases 5488 3920 se_admin

Depression in adolescents occurs for many different reasons. There is no specific trigger to this type of mental illness. A variety of situations or factors can motivate the development of depression or depressive symptoms. Adolescent depression treatment is the same way. There is no magical treatment that heals all depressions. Instead, there are a variety of treatments available to meet the specific needs of the individual suffering from depression.

Research shows that there is a specific component of depression that should be addressed in treatment for adolescents. This component is called cognitive biases. Cognitive biases are patterns of negative thoughts, and changes in the way we process information. This type of bias is a common feature of depression. Part of adolescent depression treatment includes educating oneself on the term and addressing these biases in a straight forward manner.

Facts and Findings: Cognitive Biases

Cognitive biases were put to the test by various samples of teenagers. Researchers had them participate in a questionnaire to evaluate the impacts of cognitive biases on mental health.

Here is what the results showed:

  • Cognitive biases are inter-related
  • The more cognitive biases an individual experienced, the more severe their depressive symptoms were
  • Variation in depression severity is mostly explained by negative self-evaluation
  • If cognitive biases can be assessed reliably and easily, they may offer an alternative method to identify individuals at risk of depression

These considerations are important for adolescent depression treatment for a variety of reasons including the following:

  1. When adolescents are receiving clinical treatment for depression, these biases need to be addressed. Professionals can help young people to identify what triggers these biases and how to replace them with positive self-evaluation.
  2. In order to give adolescents the skills to build a positive self-concept, they must first come to terms with how to avoid getting into their negative state of mind.
  3. Learning the unique cognitive biases helps professionals tailor a treatment plan to best suit the individual

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for young women ages 14-18 struggling with behavior and emotional issues such as those that can stem from peer-relationship struggles. This program focuses on helping young women heal, recover, and integrate healthy habits into their lives. Students will learn to build healthy relationships, cope with emotions, and effectively communicate. Solstice East gives young women the skills and confidence they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us at (855) 672-7058.

Help! My Daughter is Depressed

Help! My Daughter is Depressed 960 637 se_admin

The teenage years can be extremely tough. You remember the growing pains associated with trying to handle hormones, make good grades, maintain a social life, and enjoy your hobbies or find new ones. It can all be extremely overwhelming. Depression among teens is not a new phenomenon. It is more common now than ever. If your daughter is struggling with depression, you must first realize it. Then educate yourself. Then you can provide her with the help she needs.

Do any of the following apply to your teenage daughter?

  • Has she been sad or irritable most of the day, most days in a week for at least two weeks?
  • Has she lost interest in things that she used to really enjoy?
  • Have her eating or sleeping habits changed?
  • Does she have very little energy, very little motivation to do much of anything?
  • Is she feeling worthless, hopeless about her future, or guilty about things that aren’t her fault?
  • Have her grades dropped, or is she finding it difficult to concentrate?
  • Has she had thoughts of suicide? If so it’s crucial you have her evaluated by a mental health professional immediately.

How to Help Her

This is a list of common signs that parents identify in their depressed children. If you find that your child is struggling with depression here are four ways you can help support them:

  1. Build your relationship with them. Make it clear that you are giving a full effort to understand the pain they are feeling. Don’t dismiss their feelings or tell them they are wrong. Everyone is entitled to their own emotions. Create a foundation in which they know they can trust you and talk to you about what they are experiencing. Helping them starts with a healthy line of communication and trust.
  2. Point out the positives. When you notice your teen making full effort to interact with others, get homework done, or practice self-care, tell her you notice. Let your child know you’re proud of them. This can reinforce their value and make them feel accomplished. Keep a conscious awareness of if you are highlighting or helping your teen with their problems.
  3. Provide resources and proper care. If your child needs professional intervention. Help them get it. Teens won’t willingly hop in the car and engage with a stranger about how their feeling. It doesn’t work like that. Do your research and find the therapy program that you feel can address your teen’s needs. Talk with them about how beneficial this will be and make the transition as smooth as possible.
  4. Practice self-care. Parenting a child struggling with depression can be emotionally and physically taxing. In order to help your child get healthy, you should be healthy. Get rest, relax, and allow time for doing things you enjoy. This helps you recover and recharge so that you can provide the high-level of support your child needs.

Solstice East Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice East is a program for girls ages 14 to 18 who struggle with mental health disorders. This treatment program focuses on high levels of family intervention, emotional safety, and healthy boundaries as a way to help young girls recreate a happy, healthy life. Solstice East’s environment sets the stage for an exceptional healing and recovering place. This program gives students the opportunity to regain their self-confidence, self-awareness, and integrate healthy habits into their everyday lives. Let us help your family today!

Contact us at (855) 672-7058.

teen mindfulness program

Breathe In, Breathe Out: How Mindfulness Helps Teens who Struggle with Depression and Anxiety

Breathe In, Breathe Out: How Mindfulness Helps Teens who Struggle with Depression and Anxiety 640 426 se_admin

Teen suicide. Substance abuse. Bullying and fights. Although seemingly unrelated, these all too frequent epidemics are plaguing today’s schools; and, frequently, they seem to spring from a single common source.

Kids are finding it tough to cope these days; the challenging, sometimes stifling demands of peer pressure and academic performance placing undue stress on their sensitive psyche.

In order to combat these issues—and, for that matter, the feelings of anger, frustration, and sometimes out and out hopelessness that accompany them—many school districts are offering mindfulness sessions in school.

Mindfulness involves the teaching of techniques like breathing and meditation to help people calm themselves and control their emotions.

Here is how you and your teen’s teacher can put mindfulness to work for them:

  1. Guide the teen in the commission of deliberate deep breathing exercises. The phrase “Stop and take a good deep breath,” never has been more applicable. The simple act of stopping, falling silent, and taking a good, deep breath can do much to center and calm a frenetic teen; especially if they happen to be in the throes of an anxiety attack, when the simple process of breathing becomes strained and difficult.
  2. Learn more about yoga and meditation. These sacred, time-honored arts have been utilized for centuries to bring peace, balance and happiness to people of all ages. Through instructional classes, books and videos, you can learn the principles and practices of yoga and meditation; passing this information on to your troubled teen. Teachers can lead meditative sessions in the classroom, and physical education teachers might integrate yoga into daily fitness regimens. Parents can morph a good yoga or meditation session into an enjoyable family activity.
  3. Encourage self-reflection. Train your teen to reflect on and contemplate their problems and stressors; also to discuss these issues with parents and teachers, so that you can work together to find healthy and workable solutions.
  4. Teach and encourage your teen to express themselves. When teens are empowered to release their tensions and frustrations in constructive and highly creative manners, then they no doubt will feel calmer, more centered, and more in control of their emotions. If they can sing a song instead of scream, draw a picture instead of take a drug, write instead of cut, etc., then they will develop a positive and intensely constructive outlet for their emotions.

Form a mindfulness team with your teen. When you meditate, breathe or draw/write/sing with the troubled teen, then you will bring the divine circle of mindfulness to its completion—to the benefit of both of you

teen mood disorders

Sleep Deprived Youth at a Higher Risk for Teen Mood Disorders

Sleep Deprived Youth at a Higher Risk for Teen Mood Disorders 1920 1275 se_admin

Recently, it’s become more clear how much damage not getting enough sleep can cause. Higher risks of depression, anxiety, heart disease, and more have been linked to sleep deprivation. This common teenage issue can wreak havoc on a child’s academic performance, physical health, mental health, and more. While we’re still understanding what causes it, yet another study has shown a strong link between shuteye and teen mood disorders.

Sleep deprived teens common

This is simply a fact–and it’s not hard to believe, either (if you’re the parent of a teen). According to the National Sleep Foundation, about 15 percent of teenagers report getting the minimum amount of sleep. Teens need to get around 8 to 10 hours of sleep a night. This means that more than 4 in 5 teens are walking around, going to school, and driving cars sleep deprived.

It’s not unusual for teens to stay up late and wake up early for school–especially when devices are allowed in bedrooms at night. It’s becoming clear that there are serious consequences of this behavior, though. A lot more than just being moody and falling asleep in class.

Study shows lack of sleep can lead to teen mood disorders

A new study by the University of Pittsburgh looked into the connection between mental health and sleep deprivation. Researchers found that even lack of sleep for a short period of time can increase their risk for teen mood disorders in the long term.

Results revealed that the part of the brain involved in goal-based actions and learning from rewards, the putamen, was less responsive in sleep deprived participants. In other words, they received less reaction from getting rewards. Symptoms of depression were also higher with sleep deprivation.

This study just confirms findings from many, many other studies showing the same results; a strong link between less activity in the brain’s reward system and mood disorders exists.

Overall, it’s clear that sleep is essential to mental health. If you believe your daughter may be struggling with a mental health issue, don’t wait. It’s critical to reach out to a professional for early treatment.

Solstice East is here to help your daughter

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why we centered our program on them. At Solstice, we offer our students help for anxiety, depression, teen mood disorders, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about how we help with teen mood disorders at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.