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Anxiety

Evidence Shows Yoga Could Aid in the Treatment for Stress & Anxiety

Evidence Shows Yoga Could Aid in the Treatment for Stress & Anxiety se_admin

When you think about treatment for stress and anxiety, it usually includes various clinical practices and medications, but there are simple tactics that have shown great promise, as well–such as yoga.

This is typically when you start shaking your head and thinking, “Yoga can’t possibly be an effective treatment for stress.” While yoga may not be able to cure anxiety by itself, when paired with other therapies it can add to the overall effectiveness of the process in treatment for stress and anxiety disorders.

Studies show yoga combats stress  

Yoga, meditation, and other practices have been increasing in popularity as exercise for some time now–but now they may be offering more than just physical benefits. Recent studies have found that mind-body interventions (MBIs)–like yoga–are able to combat changes that lead to stress.

The study was published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. It focused on trying to figure out how the underlying mechanisms that make yoga so relaxing work–because if we understand those, it may be easier to replicate and allow us to provide better treatment for stress and anxiety.

The researchers found that individuals who frequently use MBIs produce less of a molecule linked to regulating gene expression. When you go through something stressful, the nervous system responds, creating the “fight-or-flight” reaction, which spurs on the production of this molecule which then leads to cellular inflammation–which is connected to issues like depression and anxiety.

The study’s leader, Ivana Buric, explained why this matters:

“Millions of people around the world already enjoy the health benefits of mind-body interventions like yoga or meditation, but what they perhaps don’t realize is that these benefits begin at a molecular level and can change the way our genetic code goes about its business.”

AKA, it can improve your body’s responses to stress and how it processes it. Those who need treatment for stress and anxiety struggle with exactly that issue. They battle to stay in control of their emotions during moments when their stress is high–and their emotions often end up controlling them instead, leading to things like panic attacks.

Yoga isn’t a cure-all. It’s a practice that can be used to keep issues in check alongside other forms of treatment for stress. If you believe your daughter is struggling, it’s critical to seek out a professional for further guidance.

Solstice East is here for your family

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our students often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about treatment for stress at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Stress Management for Teens Especially Critical For Girls

Stress Management for Teens Especially Critical For Girls 150 150 se_admin

Stress management for teens is an incredibly important part of life. The teenage years are some of the most volatile and malleable, making a student’s ability to process and deal with stress essential for overall health–especially for young girls.

Recent research has been showing that young girls are particularly hit hard by stress, anxiety, and depression. Because of certain social and biological factors, girls may be more prone to feeling the negative effects of anxiety filled situations, which is why stress management for teens is so critical.

Why are girls more prone to stress?

Girls could be more prone to anxiety and stress for a host of reasons.

Body image issues

As a parent, you’ve probably heard about the effects of media on the young brain more than a couple of times. It could definitely be playing a role in causing unnecessary anxiety for young girls, though.

While on average a boy’s confidence and self-esteem goes up as they enter the teenage years, a girl’s continues to decline. In adolescence, girls continually become dissatisfied with how they look, wheres boys become more comfortable. The media and society’s expectations are most likely the large culprits in this area.

Social media use

Girls use social media in a much different way than boys. First, since boys aren’t as self-conscious about how they look, if they don’t get a certain number of likes on a photo, it’s not a huge deal; for girls, that could be devastating depending on their mental health.

Second, boys are much more likely to play video games rather than be interested in social media. In video games, you can become an actual winner–in social media, no one is a winner. There will always be people who get more likes than you on photos, there’s no way to “win” and there shouldn’t be.

Biology

It’s been shown that the “fight or flight” response in the brain stays active longer in female brains than male ones. This could cause longer and more effects from stressful situations, making a negative response more likely for girls.

Incorporating stress management for teens into daily life

As a society, we need to take initiative. Stress management for teens is obviously important. Without being able to control stress, life can easily spiral out of control for your daughter. If your daughter is seriously struggling with anxiety or another mental health issue, it’s critical to seek out a professional for further guidance.

Solstice East is here for your family

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of troubled girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, stress management for teens, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how we help with stress management for teens at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Research Shows Mindfulness Meditation Helps Anxiety and Depression

Research Shows Mindfulness Meditation Helps Anxiety and Depression 150 150 se_admin

We live in an incredibly fast-paced society. At times, it can feel like 24 hours in a day isn’t enough to accomplish everything on one’s plate. While keeping busy and accomplishing tasks is an important part of life, so is taking moments to rest. For teenagers, it can be easy to become overwhelmed with the many responsibilities of getting a high GPA, playing sports, participating in clubs, and staying involved with the community. These responsibilities are known to cause even severe anxiety in some teens. That’s where mindfulness meditation may be of use.

More than taking a moment to breathe

When the mindfulness meditation craze began, many figured it was just a trend and had no scientific backing to it. Mindfulness meditation is actually a centuries old technique that’s been used all over the world for focusing, healing, and coping purposes. Now we know through copious research that it does indeed have health benefits.

Now, this type of meditation isn’t just sitting in one place and breathing–it’s much more than that. It’s all about taking time to check in with yourself. Through this meditation, a person becomes more in touch with how they’re feeling, why they’re feeling that way, and how their surroundings are affecting them. This is something that frequently doesn’t happen in today’s world because of our obsession with constantly being busy.

Research shows mindfulness meditation improves mental health

Recently, a study by Georgetown University Medical Center showed strong evidence of the benefits mindfulness meditation has to offer. While a lot of research has begun in the effects of mindfulness training, this study seems to be one of the most exhaustive and compelling so far.

Researchers found a sharp decline of the stress hormone in participants who experienced a stressful event and then practiced mindfulness meditation. The group that didn’t get treated with mindfulness meditation took a “Stress Management Education course.” In the course, they were taught the importance of sleep, nutrition, and other health areas. The mindfulness meditation had a much larger effect on the level of stress participants experienced.

Elizabeth A. Hoge, MD–lead author of the study–explained why this is good news:

“Mindfulness meditation training is a relatively inexpensive and low-stigma treatment approach, and these findings strengthen the case that it can improve resilience to stress.”

While this type of meditation may not be a “cure all” for anxiety or depression, it’s most definitely a promising way to help individuals suffering from anxiety better handle it.

Solstice East is here for your family

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, bullying, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. We strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about how we can help your daughter at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Trauma Treatment Centers: The Effects of Stress on the Brain

Trauma Treatment Centers: The Effects of Stress on the Brain 150 150 se_admin

We all feel stressed out from time to time, it’s just another part of life. Sometimes stress can cause serious damage, though. In trauma treatment centers, we deal with individuals who have experienced more than regular stress. The Sidran Institute offers a clear definition of when stress becomes dangerous:

“A traumatic event or situation creates psychological trauma when it overwhelms the individual’s ability to cope, and leaves that person fearing death, annihilation, mutilation, or psychosis. The individual may feel emotionally, cognitively, and physically overwhelmed. The circumstances of the event commonly include abuse of power, betrayal of trust, entrapment, helplessness, pain, confusion, and/or loss.”

It’s in these times that the stress of a situation has the power to fiercely affect a person’s mental and physical state. It can severely impact how a student performs in school, acts at home, and interacts with others.

Stress & trauma disrupt learning

Stress can be positive. It can motivate us to get work done and innovate–but only when we still feel as if we have control of the situation. Stress becomes toxic–even traumatic–when we feel vastly out of control, unable to relax, plagued by stressful thoughts, and hopeless to a situation. In trauma treatment centers, we often deal with adolescents that have undergone this high level of distress.

When stress reaches this negative point, things start to go downhill. According to a study by the University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany, stress has the power to significantly affect learning ability. Researchers found that stress has an effect on the memory that makes it difficult for students to recall or absorb new information.

With the amount of stress students face in daily life nowadays, that should be a bit troubling. A lot of responsibility is placed on their shoulders, but little is taught in the area of how to manage it all in healthy ways. And that’s just the regular stress of a student in modern day America.

For students who have experienced a traumatic event, learning can be even more difficult. Without the proper coping methods, academic performance can plummet along with social, emotional, and physical wellness.

In some studies, it’s been found that chronic stress actually changes the brain in students. The pre-frontal cortex can be affected–which is an essential area that deals with learning. This can cause issues with concentration, creativity, memory, and attention, which are all critical parts of academic performance.

Solstice East is one of the leading teen trauma treatment centers

Solstice East is one of the best residential trauma treatment centers for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, bullying, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. As one of the leading trauma treatment centers, we strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness through meaningful therapy and a nurturing environment.

For more information about Solstice East, one of the leading trauma treatment centers, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

Therapy Program for Teens: Adele & Celebs Speak About Mental Health

Therapy Program for Teens: Adele & Celebs Speak About Mental Health 150 150 se_admin

As a therapy program for teens, we understand that many more people deal with mental health issues than the public believes. Many studies have found that around 1 in 5 American adults will experience mental health issues within a given year–that’s a large chunk of the population. Those people rarely seek out help, though, and it often goes on ignored. Celebrities aren’t magically immune to the effects of mental illness, either. Many turn to facilities, like a therapy program for teens, for help, but few speak out about it.

Recently, Adele, Kim Kardashian, and Kendall Jenner shared their struggles with different mental health issues. We can’t choose who our daughter’s decide to idolize–a lot of them look up to people like Kim Kardashian whether we like it or not. This is why it’s incredibly important when celebrities decide to share their struggles with mental health issues. As a therapy program for teens, we’re very interested in the public being more educated about mental health–this is the only way the stigma will shrink.

Celebrities speak about their personal experiences with mental health issues

Adele and Postpartum Depression

Adele recently came out and spoke about her struggle with postpartum depression after having her son, Angelo, who is now 4 years old. She emphasized that so many women experience postpartum depression, but don’t seek help for it because they’re afraid of being called “bad mothers.” For this reason, she decided to speak up about her journey through it. After struggling with feelings of inadequacy as a mother, she finally began talking to her friends about it and felt that many of them had gone through the same thing. This is what got her through her postpartum depression.

She admitted that she’s always struggled with fits of depression. She pointed to the melancholy themes of her songs, suggesting that it’s a type of outlet for those emotions. Adele told Vanity Fair in the interview:

“The music I’ve always been drawn to is sad. I’ve always been pretty melancholy. Obviously not as much in my real life as the songs are, but I have a very dark side. It started when my granddad died, when I was about 10, and while I never had a suicidal thought, I have been in therapy, lots.”

While Adele got through her struggle with depression without the help of medication, for many women this doesn’t work. As a therapy program for teens, we understand that each individual is unique and that while a medication or tactic may work for one teen, it may not for another.

Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner, and Anxiety

Anxiety is one of the most common mental health issues in the country–especially for young people. Recently, Kim Kardashian and Kendall Jenner opened up about both of their separate struggles with anxiety. As you may have heard, Kardashian was robbed in her own household not too long ago, which she believes has worsened her anxiety. She describes having panic attacks and worrying about every tiny thing. For example, she described her drive to see one of her friends:

“I’ve been having anxiety lately [about] every last thing. Like even driving here, I tried to drive not all the way on the freeway because what happens if a car flips over and hits me? I think of every freak accident.”

While Kardashian struggles with certain symptoms of anxiety, her sister–Kendall Jenner–struggles with different ones. Jenner has experienced sleep paralysis–which has been linked to anxiety–and frequently has panic attacks on planes. She described it:

“I am kind of freaking out. It is so weird as I get like super light headed when I am on planes and I feel like I am going to faint. I don’t know what to do as I am freaking out about even flying home.”

It can be frustrating to feel so out of control and both these women understand that feeling. To work through their anxiety, Kardashian has undergone sessions with an anxiety therapist and Jenner has begun using meditation as a way to control and cope with her anxiety.

As a therapy program for teens, we see these types of symptoms all the time in girls struggling with anxiety. It’s not a rare occurrence, which is why it’s so important that Kardashian and Jenner decided to speak up about their experiences.

Our therapy program for teens can help your daughter

Solstice East is a therapy program for teens–specifically for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls are often grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. In our therapy program for teens, we strive to help students develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about our therapy program for teens at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.

More Than Pumpkin Spice Lattes: Autumn Anxiety Treatment for Teens

More Than Pumpkin Spice Lattes: Autumn Anxiety Treatment for Teens 150 150 se_admin

What do you think of when you think of autumn? Beautiful leaves, chilly days, chunky scarves, warm fires, and pumpkin spice lattes are a few of the most popular ones–but what about anxiety? Autumn anxiety isn’t a joke, it’s very real. When autumn rolls around, a lot of new things do, too, for teens. The fun filled summer has ended and school begins again. A new schedule. A new setting. A new assignment. It can cause a lot of anxiety for teens, which is why anxiety treatment for teens during this time shouldn’t be ignored with the simple, “They’ll get used to it eventually.” Psych Central recently reported on ways to deal with autumn anxiety.

Ways to deal with autumn anxiety

Take It Slow. When the chilly air gusts through town and the leaves begin to turn and school starts up again, it’s easy for a student to get carried away and sign up for every activity available. Your daughter may think that she can be on the soccer team, debate team, and prom planning board along with maintaining A’s in all of her classes–but chances are, it isn’t going to end well. Many end up needing anxiety treatment for teens because they don’t know their threshold yet, they don’t know how much they can take. Encourage your daughter to take it slow and only pick a few extracurricular activities.

Find a Stress-Relieving Activity. There are many options out there that can act as a small anxiety treatment for teens (in non-severe cases). Instead of becoming the leader of a new club, which comes with a lot of commitment and stress, inspire your daughter to choose something like yoga as another activity. It’s active, but it does wonders for relieving stress. Yoga isn’t the only option, it could be anything that doesn’t require 100 percent of your daughter’s brain to be aware and thinking.

If You Need a Moment to Breathe, Take It. Many people feel as if feeling the pressure of stress means you’re falling apart, to deter this type of thinking, give your daughter some of this advice. Being stressed out doesn’t mean you’re weak, it means you need to take a moment to adjust and take a closer look at your situation. If things are closing in and there seems to be nowhere to go, find a quiet place and do some light meditative breathing. One deep breath in, one deep breath out–continue until you’ve calmed down a little bit. If necessary, ask to leave the event or seek out someone to talk to about the anxiety you’re feeling.

Overall, if your daughter is experiencing extreme stress, it may be time to seek out anxiety treatment for teens. Ignoring this type of issue and hoping it will fix itself often ends in disaster–get ahead of the problem.

Solstice East offers anxiety treatment for teens

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about anxiety treatment for teens at Solstice East, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

What’s Causing the Increased Need for Anxiety Treatment for Teens?

What’s Causing the Increased Need for Anxiety Treatment for Teens? 150 150 se_admin

There’s a looming question for professionals and parents: why is the need for anxiety treatment for teens increasing? Can we just better identify it now and that’s why there are “more” teens with anxiety, or is it a deeper issue that has to do with school and society? Psychology Today recently published an article discussing the different possibilities for the increase in anxiety treatment for teens and why it’s needed.

Why are teens more anxious?

The level of anxiety in teens today is much higher than what it used to be, anxiety treatment for teens has increased exponentially. Researchers are extremely interested in why and how it got to be this way. There’s a load of theories and it’s likely there’s no easy answer out there. In the article, two main outlooks are discussed, over-diagnosing or a more stressful environment.

One explanation could be over-diagnosing or doctors being too quick to slap “anxiety” on something that may just be healthy worry. But before we feed into that theory, there’s large evidence that it’s more the environment around our teens that’s fueling this new need for anxiety treatment for teens. Take a moment to think about it.

On average, teens don’t get 8 hours of sleep–they don’t get even close to it actually. So, first off, they’re sleep deprived. Next, they have a lot more weight on their shoulders to do well in school so they can get into college–which they need scholarships, too, because college is insanely expensive. Then, on top of that, colleges want you to not just have good grades, but they also want you to be active in the community and sports life. With the workload that teens have nowadays, that’s really difficult to do. And to just make the anxiety worse, about half of teens have a part-time job and about 5 percent work over 20 hours a week at that job.

Oh, but there’s more. Today, we’re more connected than ever to what’s happening around the world; the beauty, the culture, the politics–and also the violence. Teens spend more time on their devices than they do sleeping, which means they’re most definitely getting exposed to this violence that’s happening all over the world. With all the stress of daily school life, a fear of violence can be the straw that breaks the camel’s back.

So, as I said, there’s no right or perfect answer–it’s probably a mix of the theories above and even more. If you believe someone your know could benefit from anxiety treatment for teens, it’s important to seek out a professional for further guidance.

Solstice East offers anxiety treatment for teens

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. In our residential treatment for teens, we strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about anxiety treatment for teens at Solstice East, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

People Can Change: New Research on Ways To Cope With Stress In Teenagers

People Can Change: New Research on Ways To Cope With Stress In Teenagers 150 150 se_admin

Teens nowadays are under mounting pressure to do well in school, to have a vibrant social life, and to take part in extracurricular activities. Sometimes juggling all of those elements can lead to a huge amount of stress in teenagers.

Stress is known to have a variety of negative side effects which is why it’s really important to do everything we can to decrease that stress. That’s where some really interesting research, described recently in the New York Times, comes into play.

What’s this new research about?

The research, conducted by David S. Yeager who is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, discovered a surprisingly effective technique to lower stress levels in teens.

In two of the studies Yeager conducted, 60 students at a high school in Rochester, NY and 205 freshmen at a high school in Austin, TX participated in reading and writing exercises intended to promote one, specific message: people can change.

Students were told to read a science article which detailed the ways in which an individual’s personality can evolve over time.

In addition to the science articles, students read stories written by high school seniors about their experiences with change during their time in school. One student’s retelling detailed their feeling of exclusion and loneliness earlier on in high school. This student later got involved in extracurriculars and made friends, displaying that people can change their situations.

Students were then asked to take part in a writing assignment which prompted teens to give advice about change to younger students.

Following that, participants took part in exercised intended to induce stress. They were told to give a speech about what makes some teens popular and were then asked to count back from 996 by sevens.

After being put through the ringer with these exercises, students experienced lower levels of stress and were able to better cope with stress in teenagers overall. They were shown to have half the cardiovascular reaction from their control counterparts and their levels of cortisol dropped by 10 percent.  

Meanwhile, teens in the control group had cortisol levels rise by 45 percent. The evidence was clear: by creating a framework of the idea that people can change over time, participants could develop better coping mechanisms.

The second study Yeager conducted involved 205 freshmen, half of whom who had received the aforementioned intervention (reading and writing exercises about change). They were all told to fill out an online diary each day describing stressful events that occurred throughout the day.

For those students who had received the intervention, they showed a 10 percent decrease in cortisol and said they could handle the stress in their diary. Those who hadn’t experienced an 18 percent increase in cortisol and noted that they had trouble handling the stress.

In addition, participants earned higher grades than students in the control group by the end of the semester.

Lowering stress, happier teens

So what does this research tell us? According to Laurence Steinberg, professor of adolescent psychology at Temple University, this research “boost[s] kids’ self-confidence by changing their belief in their own ability to change.”

By feeling like they had the capability to change over time, students felt less stressed out about their current situation. Is this a sustainable intervention? Only time will tell.

Solstice East can help teens struggling with anxiety

Solstice East, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, helps girls struggling with anxiety, trauma, depression, and other emotional or behavioral issues.

For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058.

Stress in Teens: An Ignored, Increasing Issue

Stress in Teens: An Ignored, Increasing Issue 150 150 se_admin

Stress in teens is on the steep increase. The level of stress teens face today is proportionate–if not surpassing–the level of stress in adults. I know it’s hard to believe. I’m sure you’re thinking there’s no way your child is facing a higher amount of stress than actual adults–but it’s definitely possible, according to studies. The Huffington Post recently published an article discussing stress in teens and why it has risen.

Why is stress in teens so high?

Our world today is vastly different than the world just 50 years ago. We’re a highly connected, fast paced society that champions doers and people that get things done quickly. While we can more easily reach our loved ones across the globe, we’re also more aware of wars and violence than ever before–you can thank the internet and social media for that. School has gotten harder. Bullying has gotten easier. There are more tests, more assignments, more things you have to do to become successful.

All of the above factor into why stress in teens is so high. It’s not caused by just one thing, it’s a combination of many–to control it, we need to notice it and understand it more deeply than we currently do. While these issues may seem minute to an adult, but that’s because you’ve learned to deal with stress over time. The truth is, your child is probably facing a larger workload than you faced at that age, and they don’t know how to cope with it yet.

How can we help our children cope with stress?

To deal with stress, you have to be able to control your emotions to a degree–which teenagers tend to struggle with. We could help teens do this by incorporating it not only into school, but into the homelife. Speak to your children about stress and how to deal with it. Make sure your teenager knows they can come to you if they have any questions or are struggling with stress.

Self-regulation isn’t just something to help manage stress, it’ll help your child manage their life. Ignoring stress in teens won’t make it go away, if anything, it’ll worsen the issue. Just like an infected wound, instead of letting it fester, we need to step up to the plate and treat it with the proper methods. We need to teach our children coping methods for stress in order to combat the rising stress in teens.

Solstice East can help

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18, grappling with depression, anxiety, trauma, and other emotional or behavioral problems. We strive to help our girls develop healthy habits and lead themselves back onto a path of success and happiness.

For more information about how Solstice East treats stress in teens, please contact us at  828-484-9946.

Say It Out Loud: Unexpected Anxiety Reduction Technique Reduces Anxiety in Teens

Say It Out Loud: Unexpected Anxiety Reduction Technique Reduces Anxiety in Teens 150 150 se_admin

Sometimes admitting something about yourself out loud instead of keeping it bottled up inside is one of the best first steps to overcoming a struggle. According to researchers, that happens to be the case for anxiety in teens and adults.

According to a recent study published in the journal Psychological Science, putting a label on anxiety and saying out loud what an individual is truly feeling can greatly reduce their fear response.

The more words, the better

The study, lead by Katharina Kicanski of Stanford University,  found that the more words people use associated with fear and other reactions to anxiety, the greater the reduction to anxiety symptoms.

As the line from Harry Potter goes, “fear of a name only increases fear of the thing itself.” By saying out loud how people are feeling, they are able to let those fears and anxieties go. This can make people feel instantly less anxious.

An unexpected result

Another interesting aspect of this study is the unexpected results. Participants in the study truly did not expect that speaking about their emotions out loud would have any effect on their overall anxiety.  But it did. How, you might ask? Skin conductance allowed for these results to be seen.

Researchers compared the results of vocalizing and labeling emotions to popular techniques used to help lessen the effects of anxiety in teens and adults. The techniques they used are known as distraction and reappraisal. 

In reappraisal, individuals are instructed to change their thoughts around anxiety. To think about it differently.

During the study, reappraisal was used on a group of people with anxiety towards spiders. Through reappraisal, the individuals were told to use words considered to be “neutral”. For example, one person said “Looking at the spider is not dangerous for me.”

Other individuals were told to speak about their emotions towards the spider. They formed a sentence that included a negative word about the spider and one or two negative words or phrases about their emotional response to the spider.

All participants were exposed to the spiders for varying periods of time and came back one week later for a follow up meeting.

The conclusions

Researchers found that those in the group which used labels to express their emotions towards the spiders had a reduced skin conductance response compared to the groups who experienced distraction and reappraisal. By using words related to their anxiety and fear response, there were greater reductions in overall anxiety in teens and adults studied.

By having a lower skin conductance, those who spoke about their fears and anxieties out loud and labelled them were less fearful of spiders overall.

There have been a variety of studies associated with verbalizing fear and anxiety in teens and adults. Many of these studies have concluded that overall distress is reduced relative to conditions in which anxiety in teens and adults were never expressed verbally or through writing.

So what does this tell us? If you’re feeling anxious, talk about it out loud! It, apparently, can lessen the overall effects.

Solstice East can help your anxious teen

If you have a daughter struggling with anxiety or another emotional or behavioral issue, Solstice East might be able to help. Solstice East is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-17.

For more information about Solstice East, please call (855) 672-7058 today!