Every teenager knows that going back to school after summer is inevitable–but that doesn’t make it any easier or less stressful. For some students, back to school anxiety is a serious issue.

Maybe it’s because they’re going to a new school, maybe they’re afraid they won’t be placed in classes with people they know, maybe they’re scared to look for someone to sit with at lunch–whatever the reason, back to school anxiety is real and it can cause genuine transition problems.

Why teens get back to school anxiety

For most students, going back to school isn’t desirable, but it’s certainly not something that creates serious anxiety–for others, the thought of summer ending brings on constant worries of whether their teachers will be good, if they’ll be able to make good grades, or if they’ll make friends.

back to school anxietyThis is more than a little stress, this is serious anxiety. Anxiety disorders are the most common form of mental illness in adolescents–around 1 in 4 teens will struggle with an anxiety disorder at some point in their adolescence.

While 25 percent of teens certainly aren’t plagued specifically by back to school anxiety, school plays a huge role in teens’ lives, making it more common than one would think. For many, incidents that happen at school or related to school form underlying mental health struggles. It’s a place where adolescents grow emotionally, intellectually, and socially.

This back to school anxiety can even progress into anxiety-based school refusal. School is a place of learning and education–but it’s also a place that harbors a large amount of responsibility. And the education system isn’t always the best at identifying when a student is struggling mentally.

Helping your daughter transition from summer

First off, getting enough sleep and the right nutrients is essential for mental health in general, but especially for those struggling with mental health issues because a lack of either can agitate those problems.

Most importantly, parents need to be supportive and nonjudgmental about these fears. Saying things like, “Why are you worrying so much? It’s just school,” doesn’t help your daughter calm down. If anything, it makes her feel as if her worries are unjustified and crazy, that what she’s feeling is wrong.

You need to make sure that your daughter knows that you’re available if she’s struggling or needs to talk. If it becomes clear that your daughter may be battling an anxiety disorder, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for further guidance.  

Solstice East is here to help your daughter

Solstice East is a residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. We understand the specific needs of girls, which is why our program is centered solely on them. Our students often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, back to school anxiety, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

We have a strong emphasis on family therapy, nutrition, physical fitness. We also offer a supportive staff, cutting-edge academics, addiction therapy, equine therapy, and psychiatric services. At Solstice, we help set the stage for the infusion of light into the previously darkened lives of the families we serve.

For more information about how we can help with back to school anxiety at Solstice East, please contact us at 828-484-9946.